AN END TO EN­TI­TLE­MENT

Sun.Star Pampanga - - PERSPECTIVE! -

RONA LYN M. SAN­TOS

Steve Maraboli, a writer and behavioral sci­en­tist, once said: "Ser­vice and grat­i­tude will fuel your re­la­tion­ship; en­ti­tle­ment and ex­pec­ta­tion will poi­son it". This quo­ta­tion holds true in any type of re­la­tion­ship. En­ti­tle­ment men­tal­ity, as de­fined in our les­son in Edukasyon sa Pag­pa­pakatao 8, is a be­lief that what­ever it is that we want for our­selves must be given out to us, of­ten ex­pect­ing it from our loved ones and even from peo­ple who do not owe any­thing to us. It is also the idea that we are al­ways right, we must al­ways be obeyed or the feel­ing that we are above any­one else. If we feel this way, then we have no time to love and ap­pre­ci­ate the ones around us be­cause all we do is ex­pect or even de­mand from them. En­ti­tle­ment is the high­est de­gree of self­ish­ness, and it de­stroys our re­la­tion­ships with other peo­ple. How can we curb it? What can we do to re­frain from be­ing en­ti­tled? I be­lieve we should start by re­flect­ing: am I feel­ing priv­i­leged? am I hurt­ing my loved ones' feel­ings by ne­glect­ing them and think­ing only about my needs and wants? Then maybe we can go on think­ing less about our­selves and what we can get other peo­ple to do for us, and even­tu­ally start to give more of our­selves. We'll see that can reach out to other peo­ple, think of what we can do for them, go­ing out of our way to help them. We can­not just say, "This is the way I am, deal with it." We must keep in mind that the world does not re­volve around us, and that show­ing our love for the peo­ple we say we love en­tails sac­ri­fices.

--oOo-

The au­thor is Teacher I at Pam­panga High School

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