Novel treat­ment may of­fer prom­ise to TB pa­tients

Gulf Times Community - - BODY & MIND -

Re­searchers have de­vel­oped a new treat­ment that could be used to treat hun­dreds of thou­sands of pa­tients with tu­ber­cu­lo­sis (TB).

The study showed that the treat­ment, which pa­tients will take us­ing an in­haler, works by re­duc­ing the bac­te­ria in the lungs caus­ing tu­ber­cu­lo­sis while also help­ing the pa­tient’s im­mune sys­tem to fight the dis­ease.

“Many cases of TB are now be­com­ing re­sis­tant to ex­ist­ing an­tibi­otics. This new treat­ment could be used along­side an­tibi­otics to treat drug-re­sis­tant TB and also pos­si­bly re­duce the rate of an­tibi­otic re­sis­tance re­sult­ing from con­ven­tional an­tibi­otic treat­ments,” said Sally-Ann Cryan, As­so­ciate Pro­fes­sor at the Royal Col­lege of Sur­geons in Ire­land (RCSI).

TB is one of the top 10 causes of death world­wide. Ten mil­lion peo­ple fell ill with TB and 1.6 mil­lion died from the dis­ease in 2017, ac­cord­ing to the World Health Or­gan­i­sa­tion (WHO).

For the study, the team used a spray-dry­ing process and pack­aged all trans-Retinoic acid (ATRA) so­lu­tion, a de­riv­a­tive of vi­ta­min A, within safe­for-con­sump­tion par­ti­cles that are small enough to use in an in­haler.

The find­ings, pub­lished in the Euro­pean Jour­nal of Phar­ma­ceu­tics and Bio­phar­ma­ceu­tics, demon­strated that these par­ti­cles ef­fi­ciently de­liv­ered the treat­ment and sig­nif­i­cantly re­duced There is only one vac­cine for TB, de­vel­oped in 1921, which is un­re­li­able in pre­vent­ing the most com­mon form of TB, and is not suit­able in all pa­tient groups.

TB-caus­ing bac­te­ria and as­so­ci­ated lung dam­age.

“Un­for­tu­nately, TB re­mains a sig­nif­i­cant prob­lem for world health. We ur­gently need in­no­va­tive treat­ments like this one if we are to achieve the UN 2030 health tar­gets,” said Joseph Keane, Pro­fes­sor at Trin­ity Col­lege Dublin.

There is only one vac­cine for TB, de­vel­oped in 1921, which is un­re­li­able

in pre­vent­ing the most com­mon form of TB, and is not suit­able in all pa­tient groups.

The vac­cine works best against spe­cific forms of TB and is usu­ally given to in­fants in at-risk pop­u­la­tions.

There were 558,000 new cases with re­sis­tance to the most ef­fec­tive first­line an­tibi­otic, among which 82 per cent were re­sis­tant to mul­ti­ple an­tibi­otics, es­ti­mated the WHO. – IANS

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