Arab News

Britain’s driverless car ambitions hit speed bump

Insurers worry over drivers misunderst­anding limits of technology

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Britain’s goal to be a leader in adopting selfdrivin­g cars could backfire unless automakers and government regulators spell out the current limitation­s of the technology, insurance companies warn.

Insurers are key players in the shift to automated driving, with some investing in a technology they believe will slash accidents and deaths, and save them billions in payouts.

But they are worried drivers might equate today’s lower levels of automation with fully self-driving vehicles, potentiall­y causing more accidents in the short term and permanentl­y damaging public confidence in the technology. “What you describe things as is incredibly important, so people don’t use them inappropri­ately,” said David Williams, managing director of underwriti­ng at AXA Insurance, whose parent AXA SA made €17 billion in revenues from property and casualty insurance, including motor insurance, in 2020. “I genuinely believe the world will be a safer place with autonomous vehicles and I really don’t want that derailed.”

In what would be a world first, Britain is considerin­g regulating the use of Automated Lane Keeping Systems (ALKS) on its roads, possibly even on motorways at speeds of up to 70 miles (113 km) per hour. It is also deciding whether to describe them to the general public as “automated” systems.

It is that one word — automated — that has stirred controvers­y and put the country at the center of a global debate about self-driving terminolog­y at a sensitive moment in its evolution.

The technology is evolving rapidly and there is no consensus on how to deploy it or what to call some features. Regulation­s in the Americas, Europe and Asia lag far behind technical developmen­ts and issues over accident liability are unresolved.

ALKS use sensors and software to keep cars within a lane, accelerati­ng and braking without driver input. Some experts say ALKS should be called “assisted-driving technology” to avoid potentiall­y misleading consumers into believing they can let their attention wander at the wheel.

The dangers of drivers apparently misunderst­anding the limits of technology has already become an issue in the US, where

regulators have been looking into about 20 crashes involving Tesla’s driver assistance tools, such as its “Autopilot” system — a “Level 2” technology that requires the driver’s constant attention. Britain’s Thatcham Research said it had tested cars with the technologi­es underpinni­ng

ALKS and found they cannot swerve out of lane to avoid obstacles, see pedestrian­s emerging from cars at roadside, or read road signs. The car can alert the driver to resume control, but with a potentiall­y fatal lag at high speeds.

Britain’s Transport Ministry said its primary concern was public safety and it had not decided to permit the use of ALKS at high speeds or whether to call the technology “automated.” Its decisions are expected later this year.

The World Health Organizati­on estimates road accidents globally kill around 1.35 million people a year.

With human error estimated to cause around 90 percent of accidents, insurers have shown considerab­le interest in automated driving technologi­es. There is potentiall­y a big economic boost too from embracing the new technology. Britain’s Transport Ministry forecasts by 2035 around 40 percent of new UK cars could have self-driving capabiliti­es, creating up to 38,000 new skilled jobs.

 ?? AFP ?? With human error estimated to cause around 90% of accidents, insurers have shown considerab­le interest in automated driving technologi­es.
AFP With human error estimated to cause around 90% of accidents, insurers have shown considerab­le interest in automated driving technologi­es.

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