CLEO (Singapore) - - WE STAN A QUEEN -

“but as the great kelly clark­son said: ‘what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.’”

like how are we go­ing to pay the rent? It was things that a child shouldn’t have to worry about, but the cir­cum­stances were such.”

Per­haps this whole rolling­with-the-punches at­ti­tude was what gave birth to that Preeti­pls persona—who is, ac­cord­ing to its cre­ator, a more ex­ag­ger­ated and ob­nox­ious ver­sion of

Preeti Nair.

Her claim to fame?

Fash­ion Po­lis With Preeti­pls, a viral par­ody of a “fash­ion po­lice” video that was done in what some might con­sider very bad taste.

To­day, Preeti calls it a joke she got car­ried away with. “I just thought I had a re­ally funny idea.

I don’t know what gave me the courage,” she says with a small chuckle.

But on a more se­ri­ous note, she wanted to cri­tique the orig­i­nal video (which fea­tured ev­ery­day Sin­ga­pore­ans be­ing crit­i­cised for their fash­ion sense), be­cause she would have been “so pissed” if one of her friends got fash­ion-po­liced. “So I thought, why wait till one of my friends got bul­lied to speak up?”

“I’m so glad I found my voice through so­cial me­dia and of be­com­ing Preeti­pls. The con­tent I’ve done so far as Preeti­pls has been very ful­fill­ing. I got to ad­dress a lot of things that were re­ally close to my heart. I got to speak up on all these things that I felt so strongly about,” she adds.

“If I didn’t make that one par­ody video, no­body would have lis­tened to me. It’s so weird.”

Is there any­thing she’s re­gret­ted though?

Not on the con­tent front. She has a group of peo­ple whom she con­sults be­fore any­thing goes up on­line, and that in­cludes her best friend, and her brother, mu­si­cian Sub­has Nair.

“I would get them to look through my stuff, and they’d let me know if any­thing is too much, or if a joke is out of line,” says Preeti. See­ing that she pokes fun at peo­ple who do things in bad taste, she is all too aware that she could un­know­ingly do the same too.

“The last thing I want to do is be a hyp­ocrite,” she adds. Which is why her process also in­volves a few rounds of rewatching be­fore go­ing live, and mak­ing sure that she is 100 per­cent OK with ev­ery­thing she’s said. For the record, she still stands by ev­ery­thing that she’s put out so far.

But there’s one thing that she would have done dif­fer­ently if she had to do it all over again. And that is to be com­pletely un­com­pro­mis­ing on whom she shares her space with.

“Along the way, I let peo­ple into my life. Some of the friend­ships or re­la­tion­ships that I made in this in­dus­try has turned out to be pretty toxic.”

“If I knew from the start that our values didn’t align, I should have been like, ‘OK cool’ and draw a line there,” she elab­o­rates.

“I’m down to have fun, but I’m not go­ing to do it at the ex­pense of some­one else.

I’m not go­ing to play some char­ac­ter and say some stuff that Preeti wouldn’t say, be­cause I need to stick by my own morals and values.”

Just like some of us, Preeti ini­tially strug­gled with say­ing no, call­ing it a “dif­fi­cult con­ver­sa­tion” that she didn’t know how to have. But be­cause her per­sonal be­lief is that she needs to be mind­ful and re­spon­si­ble about the kind of con­tent she puts up, she has since learnt how to politely re­ject re­quests for col­lab­o­ra­tion.

“I find that a lot of peo­ple in this space, [when they get to­gether to do some­thing], it’s a mat­ter of: who can we ex­pose next’? Who can give us the most en­gage­ment on­line? What should we do to trig­ger ev­ery­body now?”

“That’s the scary part of this in­dus­try that I wished I’d com­pletely avoided from day one.”

her pri­or­i­ties now

Given her brash on­line persona, it’s a lit­tle bit sur­pris­ing to learn that Preeti is known among her friends as “the sen­si­tive one”.

Dur­ing our chat, she brought up how im­por­tant it is to al­ways put things into per­spec­tive, and how our pri­or­i­ties can com­pletely change when our cir­cum­stances do.

“Which is why all of those things you see on­line, the pet­ti­ness, the small­mind­ed­ness of peo­ple, the things that I’ve come across.., that makes me so up­set some­times,” Preeti says, adding that she’s glad she’s kept her pri­or­i­ties straight so far.

And what are her pri­or­i­ties, ex­actly?

First, it would be fam­ily (aww) and the hap­pi­ness of all her fam­ily mem­bers.

like how are we go­ing to pay the rent? It was things that a child shouldn’t have to worry about, but the cir­cum­stances were such.”

Per­haps this whole rolling­with-the-punches at­ti­tude was what gave birth to that Preeti­pls persona—who is, ac­cord­ing to its cre­ator, a more ex­ag­ger­ated and ob­nox­ious ver­sion of

Preeti Nair.

Her claim to fame?

Fash­ion Po­lis With Preeti­pls, a viral par­ody of a “fash­ion po­lice” video that was done in what some might con­sider very bad taste.

To­day, Preeti calls it a joke she got car­ried away with. “I just thought I had a re­ally funny idea.

I don’t know what gave me the courage,” she says with a small chuckle.

But on a more se­ri­ous note, she wanted to cri­tique the orig­i­nal video (which fea­tured ev­ery­day Sin­ga­pore­ans be­ing crit­i­cised for their fash­ion sense), be­cause she would have been “so pissed” if one of her friends got fash­ion-po­liced. “So I thought, why wait till one of my friends got bul­lied to speak up?”

“I’m so glad I found my voice through so­cial me­dia and of be­com­ing Preeti­pls. The con­tent I’ve done so far as Preeti­pls has been very ful­fill­ing. I got to ad­dress a lot of things that were re­ally close to my heart. I got to speak up on all these things that I felt so strongly about,” she adds.

“If I didn’t make that one par­ody video, no­body would have lis­tened to me. It’s so weird.”

Is there any­thing she’s re­gret­ted though?

Not on the con­tent front. She has a group of peo­ple whom she con­sults be­fore any­thing goes up on­line, and that in­cludes her best friend, and her brother, mu­si­cian Sub­has Nair.

“I would get them to look through my stuff, and they’d let me know if any­thing is too much, or if a joke is out of line,” says Preeti. See­ing that she pokes fun at peo­ple who do things in bad taste, she is all too aware that she could un­know­ingly do the same too.

“The last thing I want to do is be a hyp­ocrite,” she adds. Which is why her process also in­volves a few rounds of rewatching be­fore go­ing live, and mak­ing sure that she is 100 per­cent OK with ev­ery­thing she’s said. For the record, she still stands by ev­ery­thing that she’s put out so far.

But there’s one thing that she would have done dif­fer­ently if she had to do it all over again. And that is to be com­pletely un­com­pro­mis­ing on whom she shares her space with.

“Along the way, I let peo­ple into my life. Some of the friend­ships or re­la­tion­ships that I made in this in­dus­try has turned out to be pretty toxic.”

“If I knew from the start that our values didn’t align, I should have been like, ‘OK cool’ and draw a line there,” she elab­o­rates.

“I’m down to have fun, but I’m not go­ing to do it at the ex­pense of some­one else.

I’m not go­ing to play some char­ac­ter and say some stuff that Preeti wouldn’t say, be­cause I need to stick by my own morals and values.”

Just like some of us, Preeti ini­tially strug­gled with say­ing no, call­ing it a “dif­fi­cult con­ver­sa­tion” that she didn’t know how to have. But be­cause her per­sonal be­lief is that she needs to be mind­ful and re­spon­si­ble about the kind of con­tent she puts up, she has since learnt how to politely re­ject re­quests for col­lab­o­ra­tion.

“I find that a lot of peo­ple in this space, [when they get to­gether to do some­thing], it’s a mat­ter of: who can we ex­pose next’? Who can give us the most en­gage­ment on­line? What should we do to trig­ger ev­ery­body now?”

“That’s the scary part of this in­dus­try that I wished I’d com­pletely avoided from day one.”

her pri­or­i­ties now

Given her brash on­line persona, it’s a lit­tle bit sur­pris­ing to learn that Preeti is known among her friends as “the sen­si­tive one”.

Dur­ing our chat, she brought up how im­por­tant it is to al­ways put things into per­spec­tive, and how our pri­or­i­ties can com­pletely change when our cir­cum­stances do.

“Which is why all of those things you see on­line, the pet­ti­ness, the small­mind­ed­ness of peo­ple, the things that I’ve come across.., that makes me so up­set some­times,” Preeti says, adding that she’s glad she’s kept her pri­or­i­ties straight so far.

And what are her pri­or­i­ties, ex­actly?

First, it would be fam­ily (aww) and the hap­pi­ness of all her fam­ily mem­bers.

Next, it would be her men­tal health and per­sonal hap­pi­ness. “That’s some­thing that, I think, I let slide way too of­ten,” she muses.

“I’m the big­gest worrier I know. I’d over­think and worry about so many things. My friends would be like: ‘You know what, Preeti? Just go off­line. Just go to sleep.”

Cit­ing an ex­am­ple from just the night be­fore, she saw some things on­line that were set­ting her off (we’re guess­ing things got per­sonal), but in­stead of re­spond­ing, she put her phone down and went back to her game of Over­cooked! with her friends.

“That’s me fo­cus­ing on me. That’s me telling my­self: ‘You know what? This is not im­por­tant. This is not worth me stay­ing up till the mid­dle of the night, stress­ing over.’”

“That’s some­thing that

I’m still learn­ing how to do; to pri­ori­tise my­self.”

Mean­while, we can’t help but hope she gets in­spired along the way and drop another video from Preeti­pls, Sin­ga­pore’s Top Self-care Ex­pert. We’re root­ing for you, we’re all root­ing for you!

Printed dress, $70.40, ASOS. Sun­glasses, stylist’s own.

Jumper, $48.17, ASOS. T-shirt, $24.95, H&M. Skirt and shoes, stylist’s own.

MAR­CIANO blazer, $399, and body­suit, $79; both GUESS. Jeans and ear­rings, model’s own. Neck­lace, $29, ALDO. Belt with chain, $29.64, ASOS.

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