IM­PER­FECT

THE NEW ABAN­DON-ALL-RULES AP­PROACH TO WEAR­ING VIN­TAGE-IN­SPIRED LA­DY­LIKE DRESSES AND SEP­A­RATES, CAST THROUGH A LO­MOG­RA­PHY-IN­SPIRED LENS.

Female (Singapore) - - F-EDIT - PHO­TOG­RA­PHY VEE CHIN STYLING IM­RAN JALAL

In an age when we’re in­un­dated with cre­ators and sto­ry­tellers up­load­ing end­less realms of dig­i­tal con­tent driv­ing #metoo, #notme, #hefor­she, #time­sup aware­ness, it seems quaint that an ubiq­ui­tous part of ’80s and ’90s DIY cul­ture has made a come­back, with even Kanye catch­ing on (see his look­books for Yeezy). Hand-drawn, of­ten pho­to­copied, and sta­pled or lam­i­nated to­gether, the art of the self­pub­lished zine has, of late, been on the rise.

Just last month, the folks be­hind Queer Zine­fest put on a zine-mak­ing work­shop for a group of as­pir­ing zinesters. This was on the back of its in­au­gu­ral fes­ti­val held at Camp Kilo Char­coal Club in July – a plat­form for cre­ators to share their self-pub­lished printed works. Around the same time, the fifth edi­tion of the Sin­ga­pore Art Book Fair in­cluded a brand-new fea­ture: a room spe­cially ded­i­cated to zines cu­rated by lo­cal col­lec­tive Squelch Zines that aimed to broaden the al­ready ris­ing scene here. And for its swan­song ex­hi­bi­tion last Novem­ber, con­cep­tual art space I_S_L_A_N_D_S col­lab­o­rated with pub­lish­ing out­fit Knuck­les & Notch for an ar­ray of art and zines from 28 artists. All works fea­tured were cre­ated us­ing riso­graph, an in­creas­ingly (re)pop­u­lar ’80s print­ing tech­nique of­ten favoured by creative types, small in­sti­tu­tions and, yes, zine mak­ers for its af­ford­abil­ity and lo-fi aes­thetic marked by vivid, un­even hues (think silk-screen prints).

Cap­tured here: a scene from 7MRKETSVI´W ½VWX Queer Zine­fest last July.

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