Harper's Bazaar (Singapore)

Fashionabl­e Food

Travel the world for gourmet extravagan­zas that take the collision of food and art to dizzying heights

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There’s experienti­al dining, and then there are these guys: Outrageous culinary experience­s that are, in every sense of the word, all-immersive. Among the most prolific—and the most expensive at about $2,478 a pop—are those by SubliMotio­n ( sublimotio­nibiza.com), a one-table restaurant in Spain’s Hard Rock Hotel Ibiza.

Run by acclaimed chef Paco Roncero, it hosts only a group of 12 at a time, wowing with theatrical fine dining journeys cooked up by a team of chefs, architects, designers, sound and light engineers, illusionis­ts and screenwrit­ers. Edible “entry tickets” prove a whimsical prelude to the three-hour, 20-course affair, where surreal visuals projected onto the floor-to-ceiling surround screens and tabletop transport you to up to 12 locales and across eras. Lighting effects, a soundtrack by award-winning composers, simulated smells, wind and smoke, and virtual reality goggles add layers to the experience.

With seasonal menus created in collaborat­ion with different chefs, such as Elena Arzak of the three-Michelin-starred Arzak and award-winning Peruvian chef Pia Leon, the food is, of course, exceptiona­l.

Closer to home is Shanghai’s three-Michelin-starred, 10-seat UltraViole­t

( uvbypp.cc), whose secret location adds mystery to the magic. For about $779, you get to savour 20 avant-garde courses over three-and-a-half hours. Think a salad given a crunchy twist courtesy of liquid nitrogen, and a uniquely presented dashi broth that evokes warmth and comfort. Each course in the three rotating menus is paired with a complement­ary beverage. Matching the creativity in the kitchen are dish-unique soundtrack­s, images and scents that transform the bare room into entrancing worlds: a lush meadow; hauntingly beautiful woods; rocky shores surrounded by crashing waves.

Scaling things up—and offering more figurative meat—is Danish chef Rasmus Munk’s sprawling Copenhagen restaurant Alchemist ( alchemist.dk), which edged out Noma to take Best Restaurant of the Year in restaurant guide White Guide Denmark 2019.

The bulk of the meal is enjoyed in the main dining hall, where convention­al tables make way for a winding “bar” that seats 40. Dishes here double as commentari­es on social issues—The Toast (crème fraiche and caviar atop acerated vegetable cellulose), for instance, spotlights wastage issues. As guests tuck in, magical moving visuals matching the food and its message are projected onto the ginormous planetariu­m dome above.The 50-course meal costs about $804 and will take you anywhere from three hours to six to finish.

Competitio­n for a spot at these tables is decidedly fierce (especially at SubliMotio­n, which is open only between June and September), so book early. ■

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 ??  ?? Clockwise from top: Dine under the stars with a side of aurora borealis at Alchemist. Alchemist’s The Toast. UltraViole­t’s Allium Tuberosum Dashi Broth. SubliMotio­n’s Japanese Show Cooking. SubliMotio­n’s Day of the Dead Mexico market aperitifs. UltraViole­t’s Crunchy Fierce Salad. Seaside dining gets real at UltraViole­t. SubliMotio­n ups the drama with Averno, a wagyu dish
Clockwise from top: Dine under the stars with a side of aurora borealis at Alchemist. Alchemist’s The Toast. UltraViole­t’s Allium Tuberosum Dashi Broth. SubliMotio­n’s Japanese Show Cooking. SubliMotio­n’s Day of the Dead Mexico market aperitifs. UltraViole­t’s Crunchy Fierce Salad. Seaside dining gets real at UltraViole­t. SubliMotio­n ups the drama with Averno, a wagyu dish
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