THE POTPOURRI: RE­DE­FINED

Herworld (Singapore) - - GREAT STUFF -

To say French cou­ple Alexan­dre Pif­faut and San­dra Fuzier are purists is putting it mildly. To el­e­vate potpourri from how peo­ple of­ten think of it (dried scented flow­ers that col­lect dust and tiny in­sects while dis­in­te­grat­ing into a mess), they looked for the best medium to dis­trib­ute their brand of es­sen­tial oil-based home fra­grances, Mad et Len. They found it in the Sa­hara desert, in the form of por­ous vol­canic rocks that ab­sorb and re­tain fra­grance bet­ter than tra­di­tional potpourri. The pres­cented rock is en­cased in rec­tan­gu­lar or round brushed black metal lid­ded “pots” that are as heavy as cast iron, and re­sem­ble ar­chae­o­log­i­cal fi nds. Two vari­a­tions are avail­able at L’ar­moire. Our fave (above): the sweet and woody Black Cham­paka, $190. The other is the spicy and earthy Terre Noire (in a round box), $340. Each comes with a mini vial of its scent for re­fresh­ing the vol­canic rock.

PHO­TOG­RA­PHY VEE CHIN, AS­SISTED BY PHYLLICIA WANG STYLING SHAN

All Mad et Len’s herbs and flow­ers for its es­sen­tial oils are grown in a tiny vil­lage in Ver­don near Grasse. They are steamdis­tilled for up to two years for the oils to reach their max­i­mum po­tency – the way French chemists used to do it hun­dreds of years ago, be­fore sol­vent ex­trac­tion was in­tro­duced.

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