MEET OUR CRAZY FIT ASIAN

PIERRE Png's Movies-star work­out

Men's Health (Singapore) - - FRONT PAGE -

YES, I DO­NATED PART OF MY LIVER TO AN­DREA- BUT TO PUT THINGS IN PRESPECTIVE, IT’S AN EX­PE­RI­ENCE WHERE I’M STILL LEARN­ING AS IT GOES ALONG.

TALK­ING CRAZY RICH ASIANS

With Crazy Rich Asians, there was noth­ing to lose- I au­di­tioned for three roles- Nick Young, the lead char­ac­ter; his best friend, and the role I ul­ti­mately got- Michael Teo. He’s a true-blue born and bred Sin­ga­porean, which is per­fectly up my al­ley, as I’m also from a mid­dle in­come fam­ily; didn’t go over­seas to study- a guy who did good ba­si­cally. My char­ac­ter is ba­si­cally the only one who’s nei­ther crazy nor rich!

It was also a great learn­ing ex­pe­ri­ence- set dis­ci­pline for Hol­ly­wood films is re­mark­able you get on set and ev­ery­one knows what they’re do­ing, and for us ac­tors you just do your best to try not to screw it up af­ter all that hard work!

All that ef­fort means for ac­tors get the best chance to put real emo­tions on screen, as we’re not dis­tracted by any­thing else ex­cept be­ing in that moment and right on cue.

It’s al­ways good to ex­pand your hori­zons, rather than be­ing holed up in Asia- you could send me off to In­dia, Thai­land, and I’m game for any­where and any­thing.

LOOK­ING GOOD PAST 40

I have to say I’ve been blessed with good genes- I’ve been told many times my fa­ther is the best look­ing guy in Hougang (and some say Batam) and I got his height as well. Food­wise, I do eat ev­ery­thing, but in mod­er­a­tion.

I grew up eat­ing chili belachan- the Per­anakan cui­sine is just amaz­ing and makes you sweat a lot- that does help burn calo­ries .. and your mouth. Per­haps also it’s be­cause of my up­bring­ing- we laugh a lot, and we don’t take things too se­ri­ously. Re­li­gion and love at home- that’s helped a lot men­tally.

On my coun­ter­top, I’m re­ally sim­ple, the anti-met­ro­sex­ual per­haps. I used to clean my­self in my younger days with just one bar of soap! These days be­cause of all the prod­ucts I have to put on from film­ing, I do have to clean my­self prop­erly- An­drea, the mis­sus, does rec­om­mend cer­tain cleansers that work well and fast. Hair-wise, be­cause of all the hair prod­uct,

I’ve found us­ing cold wa­ter for the first rinse does help, fol­lowed by a sec­ond more vig­or­ous scrub- this helps me get all the gunk and hair­spray out of my fol­li­cles.

Hair-wise I do get great help from my wife’s sa­lon- Cirq Sa­lon at Scotts Square- do­ing hair treat­ments to pre­vent dam­age from all the colour­ing that some roles de­mand. Here’s a pro­tip for guys look­ing to hide dam­aged or bad hair days though- don’t use a cap! Even if it’s a trucker’s cap where there’s ven­ti­la­tion you’re covering your hair fol­li­cles and not let­ting them breathe- just go au nat­u­ral and let those pores breathe!

I wake up in the morn­ing first things first- wash my face, brush my teeth, talk to An­drea. I do put on abit of sun­screen, but gen­er­ally noth­ing else.

16 YEARS ON..

So yes, I do­nated part of my liver to An­drea- but to put things in prespective, it’s an ex­pe­ri­ence where I’m still learn­ing as it goes along. At that moment, I had very lit­tle knowl­edge to work from, other than how I felt for An­drea, and she was in a crit­i­cal stage where with­out a trans­plant she would die.

There wasn’t much of a win­dow of time to de­cide- the doc­tors gave about a day or two, and this isn’t the kind of de­ci­sion one flips a coin.

The tim­ing wasn’t fan­tas­tic ei­ther as my mother had just had her own cancer bat­tle just a year ago- she had breast cancer re­moved- and when my par­ents asked me how An­drea was do­ing, I broke the news I wanted to do­nate part of my liver.

My dad was pretty silent about it all, but my mom was very sup­port­ive, given her own re­cent brush with mor­tal­ity, though in­ter­est­ingly enough in re­cent years when I asked her about it, she ad­mits she was ter­ri­bly wor­ried too, but giv­ing her bless­ing might help in my re­cov­ery af­ter the do­na­tion.

Op­er­a­tion-wise, I did have a re­ally tough time re­cov­er­ing. De­spite be­ing a ma­cho dude and all, I found the pain quite ex­cru­ci­at­ing and while An­drea bounced back quickly, with her hospi­tal room brightly lit and full of chirpy smiles, mine re­sem­bled Darth Vader’s lair cur­tains drawn, tele­vi­sion on mute, and me just “mang

PIERRE’S PULL-UPS Do 4 Sets Of 8 IF YOU CAN’T CON­TROL YOUR OWN BODY AND MOVE­MENT, YOU HAVE NO RIGHT MOV­ING ANY­THING ELSE.

zhang” (ir­ri­tated in Chi­nese di­alect) the en­tire time. And that lasted for al­most three weeks!

Post-op, it took quite a while to get used to the bod­ily changes- I could lit­er­ally feel that stuff had moved around in my in­nards, and I was left with a mas­sive scar chest down as well. It took about three to four months be­fore pain and dis­com­fort left, and full range of mo­tion to re­turn.

As the years have gone by, I haven’t felt much side-ef­fects. To a cer­tain ex­tent, the trauma now feels psy­cho­log­i­cal- any work­outs or train­ing in­volv­ing my core makes me hold back. But fit­ness-wise I seem to have over-com­pen­sated and I reckon I’m ac­tu­ally fit­ter than be­fore. I’m re­ally happy to reach this point of my life and with the de­ci­sions I’ve made, and that’s ul­ti­mately all a guy can ask for! I sub­scribe to Ido Por­tal- and the phi­los­o­phy is if you can’t con­trol your own body and move­ment, you have no right mov­ing any­thing else. Lift­ing weights and all is great, but he likes to go back to con­trolled move­ment and get­ting full range of stretches. Very much like cal­is­then­ics- in fact I used to do a lot of car­dio, in­ter­val train­ing and tabata, but these days my work­outs in­volve pushups and situps- I’m all about AMRAP (As Many Reps As Pos­si­ble).

While sit-ups aren’t rocket sci­ence, I do take my pull-ups se­ri­ously- in fact my home has gym­nas­tic rings!

•Be­hind The Neck Pull-Ups

Grab the bar with a wide grip, your palms fac­ing away from you. Lean your torso for­wards slightly and pull your shoul­ders up to­wards the bar un­til it grazes the back of your neck. Slowly re­turn to the start. Us­ing this an­gle of at­tack in­creases the work­load on your lats.

•Hang­ing Leg Raises

Hold the bar with your palms fac­ing you. Lift your­self off the floor but keep your arms ex­tended and your torso sta­ble, then slowly bend at the hips and lift your legs un­til they are par­al­lel with the floor. This em­pha­sises the front of your abs. Bend your knees if you need to make it eas­ier.

•Stan­dard Pull-Ups

Grab the bar with a shoul­der­width grip, palms fac­ing you. Pull your­self up un­til your chin is level with the bar, then slowly lower un­til your arms are fully ex­tended.

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