EX­TRAS!

You need to ditch the male stereo­types. Ac­cord­ing to the BMJ, re­searchers found that bot­tling up even low-level anx­i­ety and de­pres­sion cor­re­lates with higher mor­tal­ity rates. It’s time to talk, gen­tle­men.

Men's Health (Singapore) - - ON THE COVER -

THINK YOUR­SELF BIG

What’s go­ing through your mind when you’re lift­ing makes a dif­fer­ence. In a study in the Euro­pean Jour­nal of Sport Sci­ence, one group of men was told to “squeeze the mus­cle” while do­ing bi­ceps curls and leg ex­ten­sions. A sec­ond group was told to “get the weight up.” Af­ter eight weeks, the men in the “squeeze the mus­cle” group (that’s called “in­ter­nal fo­cus”) grew their bi­ceps 12.4 per­cent, com­pared with 6.9 per­cent for the lat­ter (“ex­ter­nal fo­cus”) group. The find­ings pro­vide more ev­i­dence of the ner­vous sys­tem’s abil­ity to tar­get a mus­cle, or “neu­ral drive.”

HEED THE NEW PRO­TEIN THRESH­OLD

You know that pro­tein re­pairs and re­builds mus­cle. But now re­searchers at McMaster Univer­sity have de­ter­mined there’s a limit to how much pro­tein your body can ef­fec­tively use for mus­cle growth. They dis­cov­ered that peo­ple who took in more than 1.62 grams of pro­tein per kilo­gram of weight daily didn’t build ad­di­tional mus­cle. So how much is that? If you weigh 75 kilo­grams, that means a max of 122 grams of pro­tein, or about eight large chicken breasts. Any ex­cess will feed the toi­let, not your bi­ceps. Scoop your pro­tein pow­der ac­cord­ingly.

RE­TURN FROM THE DARK SIDE

Check your bag of cof­fee beans.

Light-roast cof­fee may con­tain more dis­ease-fight­ing an­tiox­i­dants than darker roasts, ac­cord­ing to a Korean study pub­lished in the Jour­nal of Medic­i­nal Food. When cof­fee pro­ces­sors roast the raw beans for shorter pe­ri­ods, achiev­ing a light roast, more of the an­tiox­i­dant com­pounds are pre­served, the study found. Light, medium, and dark roasts have roughly the same caf­feine, so switch­ing won’t hurt your buzz.

BE­WARE FOOD-LA­BEL TRICK­ERY

Some health claims on food la­bels aren’t po­liced as well as you think. Food com­pa­nies may skirt gov­ern­ment rules with savvy mar­ket­ing that touts broad state­ments about the prod­uct’s dis­ease-fight­ing power. So in­stead of “pre­vents os­teo­poro­sis,” a la­bel might read “builds strong bones”; or rather than “cures your cold,” it might say “boosts your im­mune func­tion.” That’s be­cause the FDA states there must be strong sci­en­tific ev­i­dence to sup­port a claim that a food pre­vents a spe­cific dis­ease. Parke Wilde, Ph.D., pro­fes­sor at the Tufts Univer­sity Fried­man School of Nu­tri­tion Sci­ence and Pol­icy, says to watch out for these “hints” that can be made with weak ev­i­dence. A qual­ity prod­uct will be ex­plicit about the dis­ease it fights.

FIGHT YOUR CORNER DON’T ROLL OVER IN AN AR­GU­MENT. AC­CORD­ING TO A STUDY IN IN­TER­NA­TIONAL PSYCHOGERIATRICS CON­DUCTED IN RU­RAL ITALY, A COR­RE­LA­TION WAS FOUND BE­TWEEN STUB­BORN­NESS AND A LONG LIFE. DIG YOUR HEELS IN.

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