Out of bounds

Prestige (Singapore) - - CONTENTS -

depth as a woman. She was very pas­sion­ate, with val­ues and strong be­liefs.”

Boscaini spent sev­eral years cu­rat­ing Trib­ute to Fem­i­nin­ity. “It has been a long am­bi­tion of ours to put our Bvlgari her­itage on dis­play at the Moscow Krem­lin Mu­se­ums,” she says, “as it’s one of the most cred­i­ble mu­se­ums in the world for jew­ellery. They have a beau­ti­ful per­ma­nent ex­hi­bi­tion and, more than that, they have a very deep ap­pre­ci­a­tion for and ex­per­tise in jew­ellery.”

With 511 items on dis­play, span­ning from the late 19th cen­tury un­til the 1990s, it may not be the big­gest her­itage ex­hi­bi­tion Bvlgari has ever hosted but, as Boscaini ex­plains, it’s cer­tainly very sig­nif­i­cant. “In terms of con­tent, it’s very im­por­tant. For this kind of ex­hi­bi­tion, it’s not only the jewels that are of im­por­tance for vis­i­tors, but also the sto­ries and the im­ages re­lated to them.” Some 85 per­cent of the pieces are from Bvlgari’s Her­itage Col­lec­tion, with the re­main­der from pri­vate col­lec­tors.

Ac­cord­ing to Boscaini, Bvlgari has in­creased its buy-back ac­tiv­i­ties in re­cent years. “For Bvlgari, her­itage is a matter of iden­tity. The more we pro­tect our her­itage and what’s unique about it, the more we’re able to con­vey this iden­tity. Our ar­chive is full of sketches and doc­u­ments, of course, but the jewels are at the core. If you only look at a piece of jew­ellery in a picture, you miss a lot of the de­tails that can only be ap­pre­ci­ated on the ac­tual piece. But we’re not buy­ing back ev­ery jewel Bvlgari has ever pro­duced, just the right pieces that demon­strate the evo­lu­tion of our style and crafts­man­ship.” Sev­eral ex­hibits have never be­fore been on pub­lic dis­play, such as a daz­zling tiara with blue aqua­marines, worn by the Ital­ian princess Olimpia Tor­lonia on her wedding day.

“The tiara now be­longs to a fam­ily in Rome who have links to many royal fam­i­lies. It wasn’t orig­i­nally made by Bvlgari, but re­mod­elled by us at the owner’s re­quest to make it more wear­able. The aqua­marines, for ex­am­ple, can now be re­moved,” Boscaini ex­plains.

Trib­ute to Fem­i­nin­ity traces the close as­so­ci­a­tion be­tween Bvlgari’s cre­ative out­put and the de­mands and evolv­ing tastes of women, chang­ing in par­al­lel with fe­male eman­ci­pa­tion. Along­side the cul­tural and so­cial changes in women’s his­tory, the cre­ations on dis­play cel­e­brate the charisma of women who made their own rules and chose Bvlgari jewels as an em­bod­i­ment of their per­son­al­ity for both for­mal and in­for­mal oc­ca­sions.

The stun­ning jew­ellery an­thol­ogy ex­plores and high­lights many hall­marks in Bvlgari’s sto­ried his­tory, un­fold­ing through an im­mer­sive nar­ra­tive that’s com­ple­mented by pho­to­graphs and other vis­ual aids. But it’s the jewels — once owned and worn by film stars, aris­to­crats, prom­i­nent so­cialites and busi­ness­women — that are the real stars of the show.

Th­ese spec­tac­u­lar pieces are vivid me­men­tos of the styles and trends of the eras in which they were cre­ated, whether it was the roar­ing 1920s, the dolce vita pe­riod of the 1960s, or the pop art 1980s – the lat­ter demon­strat­ing Bvlgari’s funlov­ing and non-con­form­ist spirit.

Other im­pres­sive pieces come from the col­lec­tions of the ac­tresses Anna Mag­nani, Gina Lol­lo­b­rigida and Anita Ek­berg, roy­alty such as the Begum Om Habibeh Aga Khan and Baroness Car­men Thyssen-borne­misza, and so­cialites like Bar­bara Si­na­tra and Lyn Rev­son — among oth­ers.

One sec­tion of the ex­hi­bi­tion show­cases the icons of Bvlgari’s creativity as well as pi­o­neer­ing mo­tifs and tech­niques that sub­verted the tra­di­tional ap­proach to jew­ellery, of which the Par­entesi jewels — Bulgari’s fi rst mod­u­lar col­lec­tion — are a shin­ing ex­am­ple. Nor would any Bvlgari her­itage ex­hi­bi­tion be com­plete with­out a trib­ute to all the em­blems of the com­pany’s Ro­man roots, from pieces fea­tur­ing an­cient coins that con­vey the brand’s rev­er­ence for the past, to many ex­tra­or­di­nary vari­a­tions of the sin­u­ous Ser­penti (span­ning over four decades).

The golden thread that runs through all the cre­ations, ac­cord­ing to Bvlgari’s Cre­ative Di­rec­tor for Jew­ellery, Lu­cia Sil­vestri, is creativity and qual­ity. “For me, ev­ery decade rep­re­sented some­thing new, but it was still Bulgari. That’s my chal­lenge, too… to en­sure that our de­signs con­tinue to evolve, while re­main­ing un­mis­tak­ably Bvlgari. Mr [ Paulo] Bulgari al­ways says, ‘ One eye to the past, and one eye to the fu­ture.’”

Trib­ute to Fem­i­nin­ity runs un­til Jan­uary 13, 2019 at the Moscow Krem­lin Mu­se­ums, and is on dis­play on the ground floor of the As­sump­tion Bel­fry and on the ground floor of the Pa­tri­arch’s palace at the Moscow Krem­lin Mu­se­ums.

FROM TOP: KITTY SPENCER, ALI­CIA VIKAN­DER AND LILLY WITTGENSTEIN AT THE OPEN­ING OF THE EX­HI­BI­TION, HELD AT THE HIS­TOR­I­CAL PASHKOV HOUSE; TIARA IN PLAT­INUM WITH AQUA­MARINES AND DI­A­MONDS 

FROM LEFT: SER­PENTI SE­CRET WATCH IN GOLD WITH EMER­ALDS AND DI­A­MONDS; SAUTOIR NECK­LACE IN GOLD WITH EMER­ALDS, RUBIES AND DI­A­MONDS

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