NAM YU BRAISED WAGYU OX­TAIL

SALT Magazine - - Seven Dishes -

Ac­cord­ing to Quek, Chi­nois­erie’s food is re­ally a rep­re­sen­ta­tion of who he is. “I’m a true blue Sin­ga­porean Teochew who loves Asian and Chi­nese food, yet with the spirit of French haute cui­sine deep within me,” he says. At Chi­nois­erie, the food fea­tures rare and premium in­gre­di­ents, with a dis­tinctly Asian touch.

Some of the more unique seafood in­gre­di­ents that he is bring­ing in in­clude: salted fish from Ma­cau, “Pied de Che­val” be­lon (oys­ter), spi­der crab, Ira­nian and Golden caviar, seafood air-flown from Tokyo, and even lo­cal finds such as ke­long-caught fish. Chi­nois­erie’s menu will also fea­ture items like Ca­nard de Chal­lan (braised duck leg as well as mar­i­nated and wok-fried duck breast), spatch­cock, guinea fowl, veni­son and Pyre­nees baby lamb.

For this cre­ation of wagyu ox­tail, the chef uses red fer­mented bean­curd (nam yu) and Asian spices, and braises the meat for al­most two hours. To en­sure the flavour is more in­tense, he keeps the ox­tail overnight be­fore serv­ing it. “For this dish, we stuff sea cu­cum­ber with chicken mousse and ac­com­pany it with sautéed foie gras. I cre­ated it many years ago to pair with Ma­callan whisky (for the launch of Ma­callan Master Se­ries in Asia).”

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