In­side Knowl­edge

Bi­cy­cling’s favourite tips.

Bicycling (South Africa) - - Inside -

ME­GAN FAY / MTBER

Make ev­ery moun­tain-bike ride bet­ter: pack a cooler box with a few Weiss’s, and stash it in the car to share a cold one with your friends af­ter­wards. ——F

A.C. SHILTON / WRITER

I have one sim­ple tip for avoid­ing in­juries dur­ing the hol­i­day sea­son: take your bike with you to Grandma’s, and sneak off to ride when you can. I find the like­li­hood of me in­jur­ing an in-law de­creases ex­po­nen­tially with ev­ery minute I spend out on my bi­cy­cle.

AN­THONY SIRACUS / BIKE AD­VO­CATE

Learn to DIY! Start with the Park Tools Big Blue Book of

Bike Re­pair, read up, slowly in­vest in a stand and tools, and learn ba­sic re­pairs as you go along. It’s deeply em­pow­er­ing to learn to fix your own bike. But be care­ful: your friends may end up ask­ing you for help with their bikes!

BRENT TONGCO / CAS­CADE BI­CY­CLE CLUB SE­NIOR DI­REC­TOR OF COM­MU­NI­CA­TIONS & MAR­KET­ING

When I’m com­mut­ing by bike, I al­ways try to ride as pre­dictably as pos­si­ble by sig­nalling, to com­mu­ni­cate my ac­tions to oth­ers so they can an­tic­i­pate what I’m go­ing to do.

BRETT LIDER / RIDER, AND DE­SIGNER AT GOOGLE

Wider tyres at lower pres­sure are the real deal for com­fort, es­pe­cially on the less-thanper­fect ur­ban roads that are likely on many com­mutes. If your road bike has room for 28mm or 30mm tyres, go for it. COLIN M cSHERRY / DE­SIGNER

When buy­ing tubes, I choose the one with the long­est valve avail­able. They may look too long on some low-pro­file rims, but they’ll never come up short when you re­place a tube on deep wheels. I also carry a valve ex­ten­der, in case I go through my spare tubes and some­one in the group only has one with a shorter valve.

DONALREY NIEVA / C YCLIST

If you bring your bike in to a shop, ask the me­chan­ics if you can watch them work, and learn from the process. A good bike shop should be able to teach you how to do ba­sic bike main­te­nance, like fix­ing a flat tyre or clean­ing your driv­e­train.

JEN SHERRY / AS­SO­CIATE TEST DI­REC­TOR, BI­CY­CLING US

If for some rea­son you’ve taken a break from your bike – you needed a change, you got burnt out, life sim­ply got in the way – all it takes is one ride to re­mind you why you love cy­cling. One ride, and you’ll be hooked again.

JEN­NIFER DILL / PHD, PRO­FES­SOR

For com­mut­ing, I like to have an ex­tra-large bas­ket on the front of my bike to hold what­ever size bag I hap­pen to use that day, along with my lunch, my cof­fee mug, etc.

JONATHAN MEHRING / PHO­TOG­RA­PHER

Don’t pho­to­graph cy­cling from a mov­ing car with the door open un­less you want to get pulled over by the cops. In­stead, try rid­ing a skate­board. It’s a good way to keep your hands free to op­er­ate the cam­era while pho­tograph­ing cy­clists on the road.

KYLE WAGENSHUTZ / DI­REC­TOR OF LO­CAL IN­NO­VA­TION FOR THE ‘PEO­PLE FOR BIKES’ OR­GAN­I­SA­TION IN THE US

I love mo­bile bike-re­pair ser­vices (any­one else feel like start­ing a busi­ness in SA? – Ed). Noth­ing bet­ter than tex­ting my me­chanic in the morn­ing, and hav­ing a fixed bike wait­ing for me at my house when I get home.

MATT PHILLIPS / SE­NIOR TEST ED­I­TOR

Be­fore ev­ery ride, you should check to be sure your tyres are in­flated to the proper pres­sure – what­ever that is for your tyres, con­di­tions, per­sonal pref­er­ences, etc.

PATRICK BRADY / WRITER

On a gravel climb, it’s okay to stand up and pedal; just make sure you keep your weight back, to keep the rear wheel from spin­ning out.

PHILLIP SHAW / SAND­WICH DE­LIV­ERY MES­SEN­GER GUY

If you’re rid­ing with a speaker, mount it on your stem and point it at your head, so you can ac­tu­ally hear your mu­sic or pod­cast. At­tach­ing it to your bag lets ev­ery­one hear it ex­cept you.

RI­LEY MISSEL / WRITER

When you’re learn­ing to do a wheelie, to get the front wheel up, lean back fur­ther than you think you need to. And prac­tise on flat ped­als.

SELENE YEAGER / WRITER

Drop your heels as you climb in the sad­dle. You’ll get more power on each pedal stroke.

SCOTT CROSBY / RIDER

Stop coast­ing on group rides! It’s bad form. There are only two times to free­wheel: when ap­proach­ing a red light or stop sign, and on a long de­scent.

STEFF GUTOVSKA / PHO­TOG­RA­PHER

Get­ting a han­dle­bar bag changed my rid­ing. I re­ally don’t like hav­ing any­thing in my jer­sey pock­ets, which leads to loads of prob­lems on the road – I’m the worst at car­ry­ing tools, a re­pair kit or food with me. But since I got my han­dle­bar bag, I carry ev­ery­thing I need.

TOM FUCOLORO / AU­THOR OF SEAT­TLE BIKE BLOG

In­vest in a U-lock. The medium or small sizes are more se­cure. A good lock gives you the con­fi­dence to bike any­where at any time, without wor­ry­ing about your ride get­ting stolen.

TOM HOOD / CY­CLIST

On long rides, eat be­fore you’re hun­gry and drink be­fore you get thirsty, to keep your per­for­mance from tak­ing a dive.

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