Shelf Life

The dif­fer­ence be­tween a ‘meh’ week­night din­ner and a mem­o­rable one? a kitchen stocked with pow­er­house in­gre­di­ents

Condé Nast House & Garden - - ADDRESS BOOK -

1 TURMERIC

The ground form of this in­flam­ma­tion-re­duc­ing rhi­zome has been used as a sea­son­ing, herbal rem­edy and fab­ric dye for mil­len­nia and is now in vogue with mil­len­ni­als. It’s sweet, warm­ing and slightly bit­ter. Add it to the aro­mat­ics when mak­ing curries, vegetable soups and rice pi­lafs.

2 TAHINI

Though bit­ter if eaten on its own, tahini bol­sters all man­ner of things with rich­ness and heft. It’s key for hum­mus, genius in a banana smoothie and, oh, have you tried whisk­ing it into a dress­ing with olive oil, lemon juice and salt, and spoon­ing it over lamb chops?

3 FURIKAKE

These sprin­kles are su­per­charged with sea­weed, fish flakes, sugar, salt and sesame. Let it rain on fried rice, grain bowls or crispy-skinned sal­mon fil­lets.

4 ZA’ATAR

This spice blend tracks back to many Mid­dle East­ern coun­tries and varies by re­gion. It will likely in­clude thyme, sumac and sesame seeds. Mix into olive oil and brush onto a roast­ing chicken; crush it over a yo­ghurt­based dip; or add to short­bread dough.

5 SAMBAL OELEK

Stir a spoon­ful of this hot, tangy and salty condi­ment into mayo to make a spicy-creamy sauce. Dab a lit­tle on the edge of your grain bowl or set it out with rice and grilled pork chops. And when­ever you ‘put an egg on it’, put sambal on it too.

6 NU­TRI­TIONAL YEAST

Ve­gans love this magic dust be­cause it’s a great dairy-free Parme­san stand-in. That may be where nu­tri­tional yeast got its flower-power rep­u­ta­tion, but don’t knock it un­til you’ve tried it. Its umami-ness makes pop­corn more ad­dic­tive and roasted veg more com­plex.

7 CO­CONUT OIL

We like the re­fined ver­sion of this rich oil for sautéing, as it has a higher smoke point; for more co­conutty flavour, go with vir­gin.

8 MISO

Yes, it’s fun­da­men­tal for miso soup, but it also gives in­stant depth to sauces and mari­nades. Red is more ro­bust than yel­low or white.

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