Stu­dio Mad­dox re­stores a Parisian apart­ment by util­is­ing the old

Out with the old isn’t al­ways the best rule when ren­o­vat­ing, as Stu­dio Mad­dox re­veals

Condé Nast House & Garden - - CONTENTS - TEXT CLAIRE BING­HAM PRO­DUC­TION JU­LIA MINCARELLI PHO­TO­GRAPHS BIRGITTA WOLF­GANG

Ash­ley Mad­dox has been buy­ing, ren­o­vat­ing and sell­ing homes in his­toric build­ings around the world since 2008. she blends his­toric el­e­ments with mod­ern ref­er­ences, and is known for clean lines, fluid lay­outs and a colour­ful pal­ette. stu­dio Mad­dox, launched in 2007, is where she col­lab­o­rates with a col­lec­tive of young de­sign tal­ent, work­ing with ar­chi­tects, con­trac­tors, art gal­leries and an­tique deal­ers to reimag­ine apart­ments with her trade­mark sunny charm. Some­thing of a hy­brid de­signer, dec­o­ra­tor and de­vel­oper but trained as nei­ther, ash­ley has in­fi­nite style, a honed busi­ness mind and a knack for sven­gali space trans­for­ma­tions us­ing a se­lected team of cre­ative ex­perts to ex­e­cute her vi­sion. her tal­ent is there­for, col­lab­o­ra­tion. and her spe­cial­ity? Turning great old run-down apart­ments into con­tem­po­rary fam­ily liv­ing spa­ces.

De­scrib­ing her lat­est project, a 1710 apart­ment in one of Paris’s most el­e­gant neigh­bour­hoods, she notes, ‘It’s about adding per­son­al­ity but per­son­al­ity in a way that’s not over­bear­ing, and the joy of do­ing this in Paris is that you have these amaz­ing spa­ces that have been ne­glected for a long time.’ The charm and el­e­gance of the orig­i­nal pe­riod de­tail­ing is still fresh and un­usual to her amer­i­can eye so she likes to re­tain those char­ac­ter­is­tics, of­ten in new it­er­a­tions, but equally amer­i­can, and what she par­tic­u­larly brings to the mix is a sen­si­bil­ity for ac­com­mo­dat­ing easy-go­ing but ef­fi­cient fam­ily liv­ing. Work­ing with Parisian-based GCG Ar­chi­tects and con­tract­ing team WITO, ash­ley started by rip­ping out the

linoleum floors and knock­ing down the low­ered ceil­ing. In the hall­way, ar­chi­traves from the sa­lon were repo­si­tioned. Pre­vi­ously en­closed, the sa­lon was opened up, mak­ing the whole space feel brighter, lighter and more pleas­ant. over­all, the re­vamped in­te­rior has a mod­ern lay­out with an easy flow and beau­ti­ful pe­riod de­tail­ing. For Ash­ley, the aim is to tidy things up but not take away and adding in com­fort and light. There is now a bath­room per bed­room and the colour scheme is de­light­fully warm and invit­ing. The pre­vi­ously tiny kitchen has been moved and de­signed with an am­ple coun­ter­top and equally am­ple sink.

‘In amer­ica, we al­ways have a big sink. When you have friends over for drinks, you can put ev­ery­thing in it and you can’t see a thing.’ The gloss blue-painted win­dow

seat in the din­ing room was in­spired by a Parisian café, and again, comes down to a com­fort choice. It’s about try­ing to an­tic­i­pate nice places to sit. ‘We knew the blue would be a strong vis­ual fo­cus,’ ash­ley ex­plains of the use of colour in this gal­ley-style space. ‘In these clas­si­cal rooms, colour ac­tu­ally makes the rooms feel taller as well as giv­ing a good graphic punch.’ The blue also ties in with the kitchen cab­i­nets, which re­lates to the blue bed­room and the ‘Toro’ sa­lon chairs.

Bold graphic wall treat­ments and lay­ered pat­terned floors are other key through-points that de­liver a co­her­ent look off­set by an en­gag­ing fizz of clas­si­cal and mid-cen­tury mod­ern fur­ni­ture. Mind­ful of shape and form, items such as the burled wood kitchen ta­ble (Ital­ian, found in hol­land) is com­bined with Mar­cel Breuer chairs (ger­man, found in Italy). Picked up from a flea mar­ket, the Mu­rano chan­de­lier in the kitchen picks up on the style of an aus­trian Thonet chair (sourced in Mar­rakech), and it’s this multi-cul­tural, eclec­tic yet edited ap­proach that dis­tin­guishes her work. Stu­dio Mad­dox stu­dio-mad­dox.com; GCG Ar­chi­tects gcg-ar­chi­tectes.com; WITO wito.pro

left, from top the vast liv­ing room al­lows for the sculp­tural fur­ni­ture to stand out; ex­u­ber­ant botan­i­cal prints In the hall­way Con­trast with the satin fin­ish black french doors

op­po­site page, clock­wise, from top left the green bed­room’s bath­room fea­tures ‘artichoke’ tiles by popham de­sign; the se­cond bed­room; the In­door gar­den atrium; the beau­ti­fully de­tailed gal­ley kitchen

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.