a glass-and-tim­ber villa on the slopes of Ta­ble Moun­tain is the per­fect union of rus­tic charm and mod­ern lux­ury

ON THE CITY-FAC­ING SLOPES OF TA­BLE MOUN­TAIN, A MOD­ERNIST VILLA FINDS ITS NAT­U­RAL FIT GRAFTED INTO THE BEDROCK AND BE­TWEEN THE BRANCHES OF ITS UNIQUE SET­TING

Condé Nast House & Garden - - CONTENTS - TEXT LIZ MOR­RIS PRO­DUC­TION PETE BER­MEJO PHO­TO­GRAPHS MONTSE GAR­RIGA GRAU

Warm, er­gonomic and in­te­grated craftily into the land­scape, this fam­ily home, lo­cated in cape Town’s real es­tate sweet spot, is an ex­em­plar of grand scale un­der­state­ment, un­usual for an area whose stock-in-trade is con­spic­u­ous con­struc­tions. From the

ex­te­rior, de­signed by ar­chi­tect antonio zani­novic, largely cam­ou­flaged by leafy, dap­pled shad­ows as you ap­proach via an un­du­lat­ing drive­way, to the in­te­rior, de­scribed by okha In­te­ri­ors creative di­rec­tor adam court – who was in­volved with antonio’s vi­sion of the project from the out­set – as ‘non­cha­lant, ca­sual al­most’, it’s a tan­ta­lis­ingly slow re­veal be­fore you ex­pe­ri­ence the full power of the place.

That power is about be­ing seam­lessly syn­the­sised into a rare tree­top idyll, with a cine­matic sense of seclu­sion that feels both com­pletely nat­u­ral and un­be­liev­ably lux­u­ri­ous.

But, achiev­ing emo­tional lux­ury is an art be­cause suc­cess re­lies on a very deft orches­tra­tion of vis­ual in­for­ma­tion. Too much style du jour swank and the vibe could morph into the dull din of be­ing overly fash­ioney, too much sotto voce anti-state­ment and it could feel too posed, nei­ther of which would have struck a sim­patico chord. ‘We kept it re­ally sim­ple, didn’t over de­sign it, and didn’t im­pose a sense of state­ment-mak­ing dec­o­rat­ing tropes on the space,’ ex­plains adam.

In fact, there are in­stances where the lack of rule book com­pli­ance feels au­da­cious. such as the L-shaped ‘Monk’

sofa in the liv­ing room, po­si­tioned with its back to the view, thereby deny­ing the ob­vi­ous prize but cre­at­ing in­stead the very nec­es­sary plea­sure of a le­git­i­mately invit­ing so­cial space. an­other de­ci­sion was to use no cold ma­te­ri­als for the in­te­rior architecture. ‘The ma­te­rial lan­guage could be termed or­ganic min­i­mal­ism,’ says adam. no mar­ble, no met­als – the two el­e­ments that in de­sign short­hand cue sleek and smart – were not cards that needed play­ing in this in­stance.

In­stead, adam aimed for patina. rock face cladding, wooden pan­elled ceil­ings, raw off-shut­ter con­crete, her­ring­bone tim­ber or an­tique fin­ished gran­ite floors. Linen up­hol­stery, vel­vet din­ing chairs from Minotti, and mo­ments of scaled up drama via a pair of mid-cen­tury sput­nikstyle chan­de­liers, an oak din­ing ta­ble the size of an amer­i­can-made sedan, and an edgy it­er­a­tion of a tilted, shifted mir­ror in­stal­la­tion, both by okha, which de­liver a per­fectly ap­pro­pri­ate mi­cro­dose of high­end at­ti­tude.

The liv­ing room leads onto a ter­race from which you can walk down to the large rec­tan­gu­lar non-rim flow­ing pool, and a very lovely el­e­vated pav­il­ion a short dis­tance fur­ther.

The liv­ing here is con­tex­tual, the ma­te­ri­als con­tex­tual and like the in­te­ri­ors of some of the most ap­peal­ing mid­cen­tury homes we look to for in­spi­ra­tion, the mes­sage is about mod­esty, in­for­mal­ity, the pos­si­bil­ity of a freestyling play­ful­ness that when com­bined with the majesty out­side be­comes a be­guil­ing screen­play for con­tem­po­rary liv­ing.

THE KITCHEN ZONE IS DISTIN­GUISHED FROM THE DIN­ING AREA BY A CHANGE OF FLOOR AND CEIL­ING MA­TE­RI­ALS. ‘ETCH’ BAR STOOLS FROM OKHA IN CLIVIA RED

THE OPEN DIN­ING AND LIV­ING AREA WITH WRAP-AROUND WALL-TOWALL WIN­DOWS PRO­VIDE VIEWS THROUGH THE TREES TO THE CITY BOWL BE­LOW. THE TA­BLE IS BY OKHA, WITH CHAIRS FROM MINOTTI

A VIEW FROM THE LIV­ING ROOM ACROSS THE PINK AND RED AP­POINTED SEAT­ING AREA SHOW­ING THE SYNCOPATION OF RAW MA­TE­RI­ALS

AN­CHORED BY A HI­MALAYAN WOOL AND SILK RUG, THE L-SHAPED ‘MONK’ SOFA AND CHAISE CRE­ATE A COM­PELLING SEAT­ING AREA FRAMED BY THE VIEW

PIV­OT­ING THE LIV­ING AND DIN­ING AREA IS A GLASSENCASED FIRE­PLACE CLAD IN ROUGH GRAN­ITE. RED ‘Maxx’ ARM­CHAIRS FROM OKHA PUNC­TU­ATE THE SEAT­ING AREA

SLAT­TED OAK TIM­BER PAN­ELLING IN THE BATH­ROOM CON­TIN­UES THE NAT­U­RAL MA­TE­RIAL PAL­ETTE

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