‘No land’ for same-sex cou­ples

Nonkonyana says lead­ers must refuse sites to gays

Daily Dispatch - - News - LULAMILE FENI

RU­RAL com­mu­ni­ties and their tra­di­tional lead­ers will not de­mar­cate res­i­den­tial sites for peo­ple who are in­volved in same-sex mar­riages.

This was said by Con­tralesa pro­vin­cial chair­man Chief Mwelo Nonkonyana at the fu­neral of AmaXhosa se­nior royal mem­ber and East­ern Cape House of Tra­di­tional Lead­ers (ECHTL) ex­ec­u­tive mem­ber Chief Mthetho Ngube­sizwe Sig­cawu yes­ter­day.

Thou­sands of mourn­ers at­tended the fu­neral at Ngx­akaxha Great Place near Du­tywa.

Nonkonyana said it was against tra­di­tional be­liefs for a man to marry an­other man.

“Ac­cord­ing to God’s law, man should marry a woman. Same-sex union is not only anti-God but also un-African,” Nonkonyana said.

“In our ru­ral ar­eas we will never de­mar­cate res­i­den­tial land for any man who is mar­ried to an­other man, not be­cause we pun­ish them, but be­cause sites are ac­cord­ing to our prac­tices and are de­mar­cated for a mar­ried man who has a wife.”

Also speak­ing at the event, Co­op­er­a­tive Gov­er­nance and Tra­di­tional Af­fairs MEC Fik­ile Xasa said tra­di­tional lead­ers and govern­ment should work to­gether to en­sure de­vel­op­ment in ru­ral ar­eas.

“We want tra­di­tional lead­ers and other sec­tors to as­sist fight­ing crime, cor­rup­tion and fraud. [Sig­cawu] was an ex­em­plary tra­di­tional leader who sweated for the de­vel­op­ment of his peo­ple and [was an ex­am­ple of] the true mean­ing of tra­di­tional lead­er­ship,” Xasa said.

Sig­cawu, 53, as head of Ama- Gcaleka AseGwadana Tra­di­tional Coun­cil, over­saw five ad­min­is­tra­tive ar­eas from his Ngx­akaxha Great Place for 25 years.

He died on April 5 when his car col­lided with a truck near Du­tywa. Just weeks ear­lier, he had been of­fi­cially en­robed by his nephew, King AmaXhosa King Mpen­dulo Sig­cawu, dur­ing which he was draped in a leop­ard skin and given a rul­ing stick.

Sig­cawu was chair of the ECHTL’s tra­di­tions, cus­toms and cul­ture port­fo­lio com­mit­tee. He was also the chap­lain-in-chief of the ECHTL, deal­ing with re­li­gious mat­ters, as well as a Con­tralesa PEC mem­ber.

ECHTL chair­man Chief Ngan­gomh­laba Matanz­ima con­soled mourn­ers in­clud­ing AmaTshawe royal clan mem­bers and tra­di­tional, govern­ment and church lead­ers.

“He [Chief Sig­cawu] was a pil­lar and an ex­em­plary leader but God de­cided that he de­part here. As tra­di­tional lead­ers we must learn from his legacy,” Matanz­ima said.

One of Sig­cawu’s 11 chil­dren, Zuk­iswa Sig­cawu, urged mourn­ers to rather cel­e­brate a life well lived than mourn his de­par­ture.

“Although he was busy he al­ways had time for his chil­dren. He loved mu­sic, so let us sing and cel­e­brate,” Zuk­iswa said.

Among those who at­tended the fu­neral were King Sig­cawu, AmaRharhabe Re­gent-Queen Noloy­iso Sandile, Western Them­bu­land King Dal­imvula Matanz­ima, Western Mpon­doland King Ndamase Ndamase and AmaMpondo King Zanozuko Sig­cau.

Con­tralesa sec­re­tary-gen­eral Chief Xo­lile Ndevu, his pro­vin­cial coun­ter­part Chief Mkhanyiseli Dudu­mayo and ECHTL deputy chair­man Prince Zo­lile Burns-Nca­mashe were also in at­ten­dance.

Govern­ment lead­ers who at­tended the fu­neral in­cluded Hu­man Set­tle­ments Min­is­ter Lindiwe Sisulu, East­ern Cape Health MEC Dr Pumza Dyan­tyi, Mb­hashe mayor Non­ceba Mfe­cane and Com­mis­sion on Tra­di­tional Lead­er­ship Dis­putes and Claims deputy chair­man Dr Noku­zola Mn­dende.

Sig­cawu was buried early in the morn­ing by men be­fore the start of the fu­neral ser­vice in ac­cor­dance with Xhosa cus­tom­ary prac­tices.

He is sur­vived by 11 chil­dren and two wives, Noph­elo and Nolu­vuyo.

Pic­ture: LULAMILE FENI

SOLEMN FAREWELL: Roy­als and govern­ment of­fi­cials pay their last re­spects to AmaXhosa Chief Mthetho Ngube­sizwe Sig­cawu at his Ngx­akaxha Great Place near Du­tywa yes­ter­day. From left, Cogta MEC Fik­ile Xasa, AmaXhosa King Mpen­dulo Sig­cawu, AmaRharhabe...

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