District Mail

Vil­lagers slow speed­sters down

- Yaseen Gaf­far South Africa News · Accidents · Cape Town

HELDERBERG – Fed-up res­i­dents claim speed­ing mo­torists rac­ing through the residentia­l streets of Ma­cas­sar Vil­lage are pos­ing a haz­ard to pedes­tri­ans and young chil­dren play­ing on the streets.

Last Wed­nes­day (5 Au­gust) there were two ac­ci­dents within the space of just a few hours in Ma­cas­sar Vil­lage, prompt­ing anger and frus­tra­tion among res­i­dents.

“The com­mu­nity has taken it upon it­self to erect its own sand-built speed humps,” said lo­cal com­mu­nity ac­tivist Chris­ti­aan Ste­wart. “It’s not a per­ma­nent so­lu­tion, but it’s bet­ter than noth­ing.”

The sand-built speed humps are dot­ted across var­i­ous roads around Ma­cas­sar Vil­lage, where there is a sig­nif­i­cant pres­ence of chil­dren play­ing in the streets, as schools are still closed for some grades.

Com­mu­nity mem­bers also say they are fear­ful that some res­i­dents could take the law into their own hands should an ac­ci­dent se­ri­ously in­jure a child.

Ac­cord­ing to the City of Cape Town’s traf­fic calm­ing pol­icy, the hu­man and fi­nan­cial re­sources avail­able within its trans­port de­part­ment to in­ves­ti­gate and re­port on traf­fic calm­ing re­quests are in­ad­e­quate to ad­dress the num­ber of re­quests re­ceived from across the metro.

“A back­log of re­quests has ex­isted for sev­eral years and it is of­ten many months be­fore a case can be in­ves­ti­gated,” the City said when re­spond­ing to Distric­tMail’s en­quiry.

It added that the de­part­ment will im­ple­ment 150 projects from a list of ap­proved projects this fi­nan­cial year, from the date this pol­icy is ap­proved by coun­cil.

The City added that ward coun­cil­lors should iden­tify and mo­ti­vate im­ple­men­ta­tion of traf­fic calm­ing mea­sures at any point on a Class 5 Lo­cal Street and at in­ter­sec­tions or other lo­ca­tions where sig­nif­i­cant num­bers of vul­ner­a­ble road users cross a Class 4 Col­lec­tor Street.

It did not clar­ify if the sand-built speed humps were le­gal.

“Un­for­tu­nately speed­ing and reck­less driv­ing in residentia­l ar­eas is com­mon­place in many met­ro­pol­i­tan ar­eas,” said Richard Cole­man, spokesper­son for City Traf­fic

Ser­vices. “While traf­fic calm­ing mea­sures could be a con­sid­er­a­tion if the area meets the cri­te­ria, ul­ti­mately it re­quires a be­hav­iour change from those re­spon­si­ble. Given that Traf­fic Ser­vices has fi­nite re­sources, much of its ef­forts are com­plaints driven.”

He ad­vised res­i­dents to re­port any un­law­ful ac­tiv­i­ties to the Pub­lic Emer­gency Com­mu­ni­ca­tion Cen­tre on 021 480 7700 from a cell­phone or 107 from a lan­d­line, so Traf­fic Ser­vices can re­spond to the com­plaint.

 ?? Photo: Yaseen Gaf­far ?? Chris­ti­aan Ste­wart points to a sand-built speed hump in Ma­cas­sar Vil­lage, where speed­ing mo­torists pose a dan­ger to chil­dren and pedes­tri­ans.
Photo: Yaseen Gaf­far Chris­ti­aan Ste­wart points to a sand-built speed hump in Ma­cas­sar Vil­lage, where speed­ing mo­torists pose a dan­ger to chil­dren and pedes­tri­ans.

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