Infographi­c

This year’s Cricket World Cup fi­nal will be played in Lon­don at Lord’s, a sta­dium with a rich his­tory

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FOR more than a month cricket fans have been glued to their TV screens to take in all the ac­tion in the 2019 ICC Cricket World Cup tak­ing place in Eng­land and Wales. The fi­nal of the cham­pi­onship will be played on 14 July at what’s fondly known as the home of cricket – Lord’s Cricket Ground in Lon­don. The first world cup fi­nal took place here in 1975 and this year’s will be the fifth fi­nal played at this venue.

A FIRST FOR THE GAME

Lord’s is re­ferred to as the home of cricket as it was the first struc­ture ever built specif­i­cally for play­ing the game. The venue was named af­ter its founder, Thomas Lord. To­day Lord’s, with its 28 000 seats, isn’t on the same cricket ground as the orig­i­nal. It’s sit­u­ated on the last of three grounds Lord es­tab­lished as cricket venues be­tween 1787 and 1814. The 200-year an­niver­sary of the cur­rent sta­dium was cel­e­brated in 2014.

WARNER STAND

Lord’s isn’t a tra­di­tional sta­dium with a uni­form type of seat­ing all around. In­stead it has stands that have been added over the years, each with its own iden­tity.

First built in 1958 and re­designed with a roof in 2017, the Warner stand hon­ours Pel­ham Francis Warner, known as the grand old man of English cricket.

THE FIVE-MINUTE BELL

Since 2007 this sil­ver bell in the Bowler’s Bar in the Pavil­ion has been rung five min­utes be­fore the start of the day’s play. Protea play­ers Graeme and Shaun Pol­lock have had the hon­our of ring­ing the bell – but it’s not just for crick­eters. Fa­mous cricket fans such as Bri­tish ac­tor and writer Stephen Fry have also had the priv­i­lege of be­ing in­vited to ring it.

GRAND STAND

The orig­i­nal grand stand was built in 1867. It was re­built in 1998.

THE PAVIL­ION

This main stand was built in 18891890 dur­ing Queen Vic­to­ria’s reign. It has a bar, a shop and the Long Room, which play­ers pass through on their way from the dress­ing rooms to the pitch. Play­ers some­times get lost on the way – in 1975 English crick­eter David Steele ended up in the base­ment toi­lets!

COMP­TON STAND

This stand was built in 1991 and named af­ter bats­man De­nis Charles Scott Comp­ton, who played in 78 tests for Eng­land from 1937-1957.

FLOOD LIGHTS

The first flood lights were in­stalled in 2007 but lo­cals com­plained they were too bright. In 2009 lights were in­tro­duced that shed less light onto the sur­round­ing homes. On match nights the lights are dimmed to half-strength at 9.50pm and switched off by 11pm.

ALLEN STAND

This was built in 1934 and used to be called the Q Stand. It was re­named in 1989 in hon­our of Gubby Allen, Eng­land cap­tain from 1936 to 1948.

TAV­ERN STAND

The stand was opened in 1968 on the spot where the orig­i­nal bar (or tav­ern) had stood since 1868. A new bar on the grounds with the same name was com­pleted in 1967.

ME­DIA CEN­TRE

This stand was added in 1999 us­ing ship-build­ing tech­nol­ogy. It was built for that year’s Cricket World Cup and is con­structed mainly from alu­minium. It’s oval and stands 15m above the ground on two lift shafts. The lower storey can ac­com­mo­date more than 100 jour­nal­ists and the up­per level houses the ra­dio and TV com­men­tary boxes.

EDRICH STAND

This stand opened in 1991 and is named af­ter Bill Edrich, who’d played for Eng­land from 1938 un­til 1955. He then cap­tained a lo­cal team un­til 1971 when he re­tired at 56.

MOUND STAND

First built in 1898 on top of a mound of clay, this stand was re­built in 1987. The stand has a tent-like fab­ric roof so those who sit here are pro­tected from the sun.

COM­PILED BY CARLA COETZEE INFOGRAPHI­C: MICHAEL DE LUCCHI

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