Boity Thulo’s phe­nom­e­nal path to Forbes Africa’s list

The me­dia per­son­al­ity’s star con­tin­ues to shine brighter. We look at her amaz­ing jour­ney to mak­ing one of Forbes Africa’s premium lists

DRUM - - CONTENTS - BY SIYABONGA DZIMBILI

HER list of ac­com­plish­ments is long: model, pre­sen­ter, ac­tress, busi­ness­woman, mu­si­cian. And, most re­cently, ap­pear­ing on Forbes Africa’s 30 Under 30 list.

The an­nual list, which this year show­cased 120 young African game-chang­ers, is an hon­our Boity Thulo has been chas­ing for a while now – and the taste of suc­cess is sweet.

“I feel very grate­ful,” she says. “It was just in time be­cause I’m 29. This would have been my last year. It’s more spe­cial be­cause be­ing on 30 under 30 has been on my vision board since 2017. “I’m in­spired to do more.” What’s next for her? “I’m re­leas­ing my sin­gle, Own Your Throne, next month,” Boity says, re­fer­ring to the phrase she of­ten uses on so­cial me­dia. “So that’s some­thing cool to look for­ward to.”

Of course, be­com­ing a game-changer re­quires plenty of hard work and Boity has been putting in the hours since she first made an ap­pear­ance on the en­ter­tain­ment scene.

How­ever, she’s the first to ad­mit things have changed since she first shot to fame 10 years ago. “The youth to­day are a mi­cro­wave gen­er­a­tion – they want ev­ery­thing to hap­pen now,” Boity says.

“I don’t think they value what it re­ally means to work and wait for your dreams and as­pi­ra­tions to come to life. “So­cial me­dia per­pet­u­ates that – the al­most in­stant life that we live now gives the façade that ev­ery­thing hap­pens now. “So they don’t un­der­stand the value of wait­ing and work­ing hard to­wards your goals, dreams and as­pi­ra­tions.”

Par­ents, she feels, are not hav­ing enough con­ver­sa­tions with their chil­dren. “Ul­ti­mately, this af­fects the youth be­cause I don’t think they are be­ing guided by their el­ders. Par­ents just throw iPads, tablets and cell­phones at their kids, all these ma­te­rial things so they can have in­stant hap­pi­ness.”

Things may be dif­fer­ent these days, but the sky is the limit if you stay true to your­self, she be­lieves. “Your jour­ney is made just for you and ev­ery­thing will hap­pen at its time,” Boity says. “Just trust in the fact the uni­verse or God, or what­ever you be­lieve in, is re­ally taking care of where you’re go­ing.

“Don’t let any­thing stand in your way, don’t let opin­ions or peo­ple box you into some­thing you are not.

“Do you and be sure that if you have a dream, you chase it re­lent­lessly be­cause the dream was placed in you, not someone else.”

Own­ing her throne is the se­cret to Boity’s suc­cess. “You must walk your own path. It makes things so much eas­ier be­cause you’re less dis­tracted.

“When you find your pur­pose, you get less dis­tracted be­cause you stop look­ing at what other peo­ple are do­ing. You stop com­par­ing your­self to oth­ers.

“Had I been dis­tracted by what someone else was do­ing or who was get­ting what gig be­fore me, I would’ve given up by now be­cause I would have felt like ev­ery­thing is taking too long.”

We take a closer look at her phe­nom­e­nal path to the top.

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