Infographi­c

Man’s best friend might be a crea­ture of few words but that doesn’t mean they don’t com­mu­ni­cate

DRUM - - Contents - COM­PILED BY ROXANNE MOONEYS INFOGRAPHI­C: MICHAEL DE LUCCHI

APART from barking, growl­ing and whin­ing, dogs mostly use body lan­guage to com­mu­ni­cate. If you un­der­stand a dog’s body lan­guage, you can learn to in­ter­pret when a pooch feels sad, happy, threat­ened or ag­gres­sive –

and pos­si­bly pre­vent getting bit­ten.

Dogs in­clude their fa­cial ex­pres­sion, ears, lips, nose, tails and bod­ies in their body lan­guage vo­cab­u­lary. It’s im­por­tant to con­sider all of th­ese and the sit­u­a­tion the dog is in or you might mis­un­der­stand what the dog is “say­ing” to you.

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