DIN­NER PARTY IN­TEL...

The top­ics you have to be able to dis­cuss this week

Financial Mail - - BETWEEN THE CHAINS -

1. Mouth­ful of the year

The Pan SA Lan­guage Board, to­gether with me­dia-re­search firms Fo­cal Points and Newsclip, has cho­sen “land ex­pro­pri­a­tion with­out com­pen­sa­tion” as SA’S word of the year, which it de­fines as “a word or term that was used most fre­quently in the coun­try’s print, on­line and broad­cast me­dia”. Last year, “state cap­ture” beat “white mo­nop­oly cap­i­tal” and “blesser” to the ti­tle. The word of the year must be one that re­flects the pass­ing year.

“My heart goes out to those who were harmed by this ruth­less en­ter­prise” Venda king Toni Mphe­phu Ram­ab­u­lana, of­fer­ing to pay back ‘any amount shown to have been pro­ceeds of il­le­gal­i­ties’, af­ter a Re­serve Bank re­port said he had re­ceived a gra­tu­itous pay­ment of more than R17m from VBS Mu­tual Bank

2. Sauce for the gan­der

The UK Law Com­mis­sion is de­cid­ing whether to broaden the am­bit of hate crimes to in­clude hos­til­ity to men and the el­derly. Hate crimes are of­fences mo­ti­vated by prej­u­dice based on dis­abil­ity, race, re­li­gion, sex­ual ori­en­ta­tion or trans­gen­der iden­tity. It was ear­lier an­nounced that the com­mis­sion would look at whether of­fences driven by misog­yny — con­tempt for women — should be treated as hate crimes. Now misandry, or hos­til­ity to­wards men, will also be con­sid­ered. Hate crimes are con­sid­ered as ag­gra­vated of­fences, which means they can at­tract longer prison sen­tences than sim­i­lar crimes not mo­ti­vated by hate.

3. Any­one can watch

One of the world’s most strik­ing paint­ings, Rem­brandt’s The Night Watch, is to be re­stored at the Ri­jksmu­seum in Am­s­ter­dam, re­ports The Guardian. The mu­seum’s di­rec­tor, Taco Dib­bits, said the pub­lic will be in­vited to watch the process, both from the gallery and via an in­ter­net livestream. It is be­lieved to be the big­gest un­der­tak­ing of its kind and is ex­pected to take sev­eral years and cost mil­lions of eu­ros. Com­pleted in 1642 at the height of the Dutch Golden Age, The Night Watch was com­mis­sioned by the leader of the civic guard of Am­s­ter­dam. The paint­ing, which mea­sures

3.63m by 4.37m, was last re­stored in 1975, af­ter a Dutch teacher slashed it with a bread knife.

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