THIS MONTH WE LOVE

Al­though it is on the pricier side, pur­chas­ing a jar of long pep­per is a last­ing in­vest­ment, as a lit­tle goes a long way!

Food & Home - - Contents - RECIPE, STYLING AND PHO­TO­GRAPH BY KATELYN ALLEGRA AS­SISTED BY CASSANDRA UP­TON IL­LUS­TRA­TION BY SARAH-JANE WIL­LIAMS

Long pep­per

While not as fa­mous as the spice that has a place on ev­ery din­ner ta­ble and kitchen counter, long pep­per has a taste that’s sim­i­lar to, but more fra­grant than, its close rel­a­tive: the black pep­per­corn. Aptly named after its pe­cu­liar ap­pear­ance – groups of tiny berries clumped to­gether that re­sem­ble long, nar­row pine cones – the long pep­per grows on a low shrubby vine and is sold dried. With its roots trac­ing back to an­cient Ro­man times – where it was widely used un­til the com­mer­cial­i­sa­tion of black pep­per – it is still a much-loved spice in cuisines the world over, like in Morocco, where it is used in the spice mix ras el hanout; or In­dia, where it’s added to lentil stews. Avail­able in dif­fer­ent vari­ants – in­clud­ing Cape, Ethiopian and In­dian long pep­per – it is the Java long pep­per, from Indonesia, that is more read­ily avail­able.

RUM AND LONG PEP­PER COCK­TAIL

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