Prac­tise wa­ter con­ser­va­tion with your pool

George Herald - Private Property - - Property News -

Be­ing care­ful about how you deal with your swim­ming pool wa­ter is ex­tremely im­por­tant.

Pools and gar­dens can ac­count for around 60% of a home's wa­ter us­age, and re­cy­cling wa­ter (quan­tity and qual­ity) for a pool is rarely fea­si­ble.

There are sev­eral ways to prac­tise wa­ter con­ser­va­tion with your pool with­out risk­ing the pool's struc­ture or wa­ter pu­rity con­tent. Bet­ter still, with sum­mer knock­ing on the door, you can man­age the sit­u­a­tion so you're still able to use the pool.

In­stall a wa­ter tank to col­lect rain­wa­ter run-off from gut­ters, in­stall a pool cover, and back­wash less ev­ery two weeks, not weekly, and for a shorter time, sug­gests Pe­ter Shed­lock of Swim­ming Pool Ser­vices in Umh­langa. Keep­ing the pool and fil­ters clean will re­duce the need to back­wash.

A swim­ming pool loses wa­ter nat­u­rally through evap­o­ra­tion - more than half the wa­ter can po­ten­tially evap­o­rate in a year - so curb­ing that loss is a pri­or­ity.

A pool cover can re­duce evap­o­ra­tion by 90-95%. It also re­duces the need to use more chem­i­cals, re­stricts al­gal growth, and con­serves heat. Apart from be­ing a drown­ing pre­cau­tion for chil­dren, there are other ben­e­fits, such as re­duced power con­sump­tion through less fil­tra­tion. Shed­lock says, "If the drought bites fur­ther, and you're forced into de­com­mis­sion­ing the pool, a cover is also less unsightly."

Yes, there are ways other than us­ing a cover, but take care. Shed­lock warns, "Don't let your wa­ter level drop be­low the weir." A pool pump re­quires a cer­tain wa­ter level in or­der to run; equally, if the pump is left idle for some time, com­po­nents will de­grade. Stag­nant, un­fil­tered wa­ter is a breed­ing ground for mosquitoes, so aside from the un­ap­peal­ing look and smell - it's un­healthy.

Think hard be­fore emp­ty­ing your pool - most pools are de­signed to have the weight of wa­ter to hold them in place; oth­ers will crack. Re­fur­bish­ment is ex­pen­sive. In ad­di­tion, take care of the ob­vi­ous dan­gers of a large, empty, hard cav­ity when there are small chil­dren around (par­tic­u­larly if wa­ter col­lects in it).

There are a num­ber of lit­tle ad­just­ments you can make. Make sure your pump is work­ing op­ti­mally (try run­ning it for less than the rec­om­mended eight hours), en­sure there are no pool leaks, and lower the pool wa­ter level slightly so less wa­ter splashes out with bois­ter­ous swim­mers.

www.pri­vateprop­erty.co.za

A swim­ming pool loses wa­ter nat­u­rally through evap­o­ra­tion - more than half the wa­ter can po­ten­tially evap­o­rate in a year - so curb­ing that loss is a pri­or­ity.

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