PART­NER­SHIP IN AC­TION

World Cleanup Day

In Flight Magazine - - LET'S CHAT - { TEXT & IM­AGES © SUP­PLIED }

PLAS­TICS|SA IS PART­NER­ING WITH LET’S DO IT! AFRICA BY PRO­VID­ING RE­SOURCES TO­WARDS THE BIG­GEST GLOBAL CLEANUP THAT THE WORLD HAS EVER WIT­NESSED. ON 15TH SEPTEM­BER 2018, 5 % OF THE GLOBE’S POP­U­LA­TION WILL BE MO­BILISED TO PICK UP RUB­BISH AS WORLD CLEANUP DAY STARTS IN NEW ZEALAND WHEN THE SUN RISES, AND MOVES AROUND THE GLOBE WITH THE TIME ZONES UN­TIL IT SETS, END­ING IN HAWAII, 36 HOURS LATER. GLOB­ALLY, 150 COUN­TRIES ARE COM­MIT­TED TO THE LET’S DO IT! CAM­PAIGN. OF THOSE, 60 – IN­CLUD­ING SOUTH AFRICA – ARE ON THE AFRICAN CON­TI­NENT.

It is es­ti­mated that each year, eight mil­lion tonnes of lit­ter end up in the en­vi­ron­ment, caus­ing a se­ri­ous threat to peo­ple, wildlife, soil, wa­ter and air. The World Cleanup Day is a call to ac­tion for the pub­lic and de­ci­sion-mak­ers to take real ac­tion in solv­ing the waste prob­lem.

For the past 22 years, Plas­tics|SA has part­nered with the Ocean Con­ser­vancy by co­or­di­nat­ing South Africa’s in­volve­ment in the an­nual In­ter­na­tional Coastal Cleanup Day – ev­ery third Satur­day in Septem­ber when thou­sands of vol­un­teers are en­cour­aged to help col­lect and re­move lit­ter from our wa­ter­ways as part of Cleanup & Re­cy­cle SA week.This year it will take place from 10th to 15th Septem­ber 2018, cul­mi­nat­ing in the first World Cleanup Day.

“This is the big­gest pos­i­tive civic ac­tion the world has seen, and we are for­tu­nate to be part of this global move­ment that hopes to in­spire change in hu­man be­hav­iour,” says Douw Steyn, Sus­tain­abil­ity Di­rec­tor of Plas­tics|SA.

Plas­tics|SA is one of the first sig­na­to­ries of the Marine De­bris Dec­la­ra­tion, whereby 74 plas­tics as­so­ci­a­tions from around the world have com­mit­ted them­selves to fight marine lit­ter, Plas­tics|SA ac­tively sup­ports projects in six key ar­eas aimed at con­tribut­ing to sus­tain­able so­lu­tions. These are: ed­u­ca­tion, re­search, pub­lic pol­icy, shar­ing best prac­tices, plas­tics re­cy­cling/ re­cov­ery, and plas­tic pel­let con­tain­ment.

“We have man­aged to get the plas­tics in­dus­try, pack­ag­ing streams and re­tail­ers to sup­port our ef­forts and re­cy­cling ini­tia­tives, such as our beach clean-ups, Op­er­a­tion Clean Sweep, spon­sor­ing lit­ter booms, and the Aqua Amaz­ing Schools ed­u­ca­tion pro­gramme. Last year alone, we do­nated 350,000 yel­low refuse bags that were used for clean-ups around the coun­try, and as­sisted co­or­di­na­tors with au­dited clean-ups,” he says.

Ap­prox­i­mately 80 % of ocean lit­ter is de­rived from land­based waste.With­out ef­fec­tive waste col­lec­tion, an avalanche of de­bris will en­ter the ocean.To pre­vent this, Plas­tics|SA is not only en­cour­ag­ing South Africans of all ages, races and back­grounds to par­tic­i­pate in this year’s Cleanup and Re­cy­cle SA week ac­tiv­i­ties and World Cleanup Day, but also to be re­spon­si­ble in their daily ac­tiv­i­ties by en­sur­ing their re­cy­clables are col­lected for re­cy­cling, as we all con­tinue to work to­wards a com­mon goal: cre­at­ing a cleaner world.

For more in­for­ma­tion, and part­ners, visit www.plas­tic­sinfo.co.za or www.lets­doit­world.org.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.