Axes

Popular Mechanics (South Africa) - - Contents - All prod­ucts avail­able for na­tion­wide de­liv­ery at just­likepapa.com.

1 / GER­BER DOWNRANGE TOM­A­HAWK // R6 060

Three tools in one makes for ex­cep­tion­ally good value. The head has a cut­ting edge and a ham­mer head welded on the other side; the cut-out area is moulded to serve as the han­dle for the pry-tool on the end of the tang. Forged from heat-treated high­car­bon steel, this tom­a­hawk will last a long time and the nifty sheath clips on to al­most any gear.

2 / WETTERLINGS SPLIT­TING AXE // R2 125

This is prob­a­bly what you were ex­pect­ing when we said ‘axes’. Split­ting axes are the most com­mon form of do­mes­tic axe and are very well de­signed for chop­ping up fire­wood. You want the force of the swing to get the wedge to split the fi­bres of the wood along the grain – an axe doesn’t tech­ni­cally ‘cut’ through wood. Go for a good wooden han­dle to help with the shock.

3 / ESEE 5 TAC­TI­CAL KNIFE // R3 000+

The mid­dle child of the range still ben­e­fits from the US SERE (spe­cialised Sur­vival, Eva­sion, Re­sis­tance and Es­cape training for US mil­i­tary and Depart­ment of De­fense con­trac­tors) in­struc­tor de­vel­op­ment and full-tang con­struc­tion. Use it to split smaller pieces of wood ( see be­low) or to feather larger pieces to get the fire go­ing quicker. It also works well with a fer­rous rod.

4 / COLD STEEL SPECIAL FORCES SHOVEL // R695

Much like the knife on this list, this isn’t an axe. To be fair, this isn’t a par­tic­u­larly good spade ei­ther be­cause it lacks a dra­matic dirt-scoop­ing curve. But the blade is sharp­ened all around the use­ful bit of the spade, which is great for cut­ting through roots or us­ing it as an im­promptu throw­ing knife. A 2 mm medium car­bon steel blade and hard­wood han­dle make this a use­ful tool to have in your out­door ar­se­nal.

5 / WETTERLINGS AMER­I­CAN FOR­EST AXE // R2 020

This tall boy is, in essence, a split­ting axe with a long han­dle for ex­tra lever­age. Tree-felling axe heads typ­i­cally weigh in at around 1.5 kg and should be wielded in sim­i­lar fash­ion to a split­ting axe. You want to make a down­ward ‘V’ and should aim for a 45˚ chop on ei­ther side of the tree trunk. This model has a high-strength Swedish steel head and hick­ory han­dle.

5 1 4 2 3

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.