SA Bass

“The Art of Flipping (Part 2)”

In this three part series we look at the art of flipping which will enlighten and assist you to catch more and bigger fish. In this issue we look at the flipping system.

- >> Gordon Brown*

In this three part series we look at the art of flipping which will enlighten and assist you to catch more and bigger fish. In this issue we look at the flipping system – Gordon Brown

Changing from ultra-light to flipping is like switching from a powder puff to sandpaper – it is the greatest contrast in bass fishing. Flipping was originated and perfected by a couple of California­ns, Dee Thomas and Dave Gliebe in the late 1970’s.

I need to pose the question again, namely: “what is flipping”?

My answer is as follows: “It is a controlled casting method that provides precise line control and bait placement for casts of between 3 and 7 metres. It is most easily achieved by using a 7ft or longer rod and always a free-spool baitcastin­g reel”.

Flipping offers three definite advantages

* It offers a quiet, no-splash presentati­on.

* It provides precision and accuracy.

* It provides the angler with the maximum control of any size fish.

Why do you need such control? Almost every lake has some type of heavy cover and my observatio­n is that it is usually not being fished right in the thickest places. Anglers tend to cast all around it, and still too many are unable to get their lures way back into the thick, bass-holding structure and cover.

To start flipping, tie on a jig and let out about fifteen feet of line, more or less depending on water depth and how long a flip you want to make. With your left hand, take line from between the reel and the first guide and hold it out to the side, leaving about 7ft of line hanging from the rod tip. Swing the jig under the rod, following it slightly by lowering the rod tip, which will allow the jig to swing further back and will also put the rod in the proper tip-down position for the next move.

As the jig starts forward, begin raising the rod tip and move your hand forward to increase the lure speed. At the end of the swing, give the rod tip a gentle flip to send the jig on its way. As the jig moves toward the target, let the line in your left hand slip through your fingers, but don’t let go of it. Just before the jig hits the water, grip the slipping line. With practice, you’ll be able to stop the jig an inch above the water and let it slip in with hardly a ripple. At the completion of the cast, the rod position should be almost parallel to the water.

Put the rod butt under your right arm and with the reel handle up, reel in any slack line left with your left hand. When you get a strike, and have set the hook by hand,

change the rod from right hand to left hand and play the bass by reeling with your right hand. (This is for those who normally cast with their right hand).

nce you have flipped into your target and have let your bait fall to the depth required, slowly raise your rod and retrieve the line by pulling the line back through the rod eyes with your left hand, ready for the next flip.

If you are just starting to flip, you can always practice at home in the garden by standing on a chair and placing three small containers 3, 5 and 7 metres in front of you. The chair is to elevate you as the boat deck is somewhat higher than the water level. Spool up with around 20-pound monofilame­nt line with a 3/8- ounce to half ounce jig - the colour is not important - preferably with the hook cut off as we don’t want stories of your cat or dog caught on a jig!

A good flipper can put a jig or a plastic worm in a coffee cup at 7 metres away ten out of ten times, and out on the water the bait would be cast so gently and easily that it would hardly make a ripple!

If you are targeting a small hole in the lily pads and your cast is off target, the mechanics of flipping will allow you to stop the lure in mid air and recall the cast and flip again. This recalling of the cast is much like what a fly caster is able to do when he sees he is off target. The bait or spin caster does not have this option. If a bad cast is made it is possible to stop the lure short of the target but the resulting splash of the bait will in all likelihood spook the fish. Very few bait-casters can make casts of 4 to 7 metres accurately, and even if they can, there is no way they can drop the lure as quietly and gently as a flipper can.

Until the next issue, practice and practice again to start getting the flipping technique working for you.

I trust that, with all the informatio­n provided in this three part series, it will enlighteni­ng and assist you to catch more and bigger fish. In the next issue: ‘Part 3’ - rods, lines reels, baits, sinkers, areas to flip, boat control and more.

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 ??  ?? “The proof is in the pudding”
“The proof is in the pudding”
 ??  ?? A good flipper can cast a jig so gently and easily that it would hardly scare the fish
A good flipper can cast a jig so gently and easily that it would hardly scare the fish

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