A quick guide to Pro’s al­bums

Sunday Times - - Review - Tseliso Mon­a­heng

HEADS AND TALES (2005)

This is fresh-faced Pro, still with the “kid” suf­fixed to his name. He brings the raw aes­thetic of rap cyphers, and nar­rates hood tales like the street­corner punch­line pugilist he’d been groomed to be­come. Lis­ten to: Soweto, They Fell, Ex­tra­or­di­nary

DNA (2006)

Pro had limited time to fin­ish this al­bum. The true heads are di­vided over whether this of­fer­ing is wor­thy of se­ri­ous con­sid­er­a­tion in the em­cee’s cat­a­logue. Lis­ten to: We Get Down, Iqin­iso

DANKIE SAN (2007)

Pro wanted to reach a broader fan­base, and this ini­tial re­lease on TS Records did ex­actly that. Trusted col­lab­o­ra­tors Omen and Dome inked their heat-laced pro­ducer fin­gers across this al­bum, while the new-found blood of IV League’s synth-laden, four-to-the-floor beats broke into new sonic ter­ri­tory. Lis­ten to: Bhampa, The Gen­eral, Uthini Ngo Pro

SNAKES & LAD­DERS (2009)

The em­cee is cruis­ing. He’s got gold and platinum al­bums to his name; brands are clog­ging up his agent’s phone; and his Dankie San la­bel is flood­ing streets. The heat-pack­ing punch­lines tell a dif­fer­ent story, though, for Pro sounds as deter­mined as ever to prove why he’s Soweto’s top don. Lis­ten to:

Sekele; Bud­get Speech; Pressa, Pusha, Panda

CONTINUA (2012)

This al­bum finds Pro un­steady. The TS Records af­fil­i­a­tion had ended, and the IV League was no more. Yet the em­cee re­mains fo­cused amid the chaos of a rapidly trans­form­ing en­vi­ron­ment. Lis­ten to: Makasana, Anivulen’in­dlela, Um’futho

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