The Star Early Edition

For chil­dren who have autism, hair­cuts can be a fear­some over­load of sen­sa­tions. Here’s how a Cana­dian bar­ber changed that, writes Mary Huis

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AFEW weeks af­ter Fran­cis Franz Ja­cob opened his bar­ber­shop in RouynNo­randa, Que­bec, in late 2015, he wel­comed a spe­cial client.

 ??  ?? LIGHTER SIDE: ‘My bar­ber­shop is like go­ing for an ice cream,’ said Ja­cob, owner of Authen­tis­chen Bar­bier. ‘It has to be fun. It’s al­ways about hav­ing fun at my place.’
LIGHTER SIDE: ‘My bar­ber­shop is like go­ing for an ice cream,’ said Ja­cob, owner of Authen­tis­chen Bar­bier. ‘It has to be fun. It’s al­ways about hav­ing fun at my place.’
 ??  ?? EASY DOES IT: Fran­cis Franz Ja­cob lies on the floor of his bar­ber­shop in Rouyn-No­randa, Que­bec, as he cuts the hair of Wyatt Lafrenière, 6, who has autism.
EASY DOES IT: Fran­cis Franz Ja­cob lies on the floor of his bar­ber­shop in Rouyn-No­randa, Que­bec, as he cuts the hair of Wyatt Lafrenière, 6, who has autism.

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