BEAT DOMS

Women's Health (South Africa) - - WHY NOT 100 -

YOU KNOW HOW, THE DAY AF­TER A PAR­TIC­U­LARLY BRU­TAL ARM WORK­OUT, LIFT­ING YOUR ARMS TO WASH YOUR HAIR PUTS YOU IN A WORLD OF PAIN? THAT’S CALLED DE­LAYED-ON­SET MUS­CLE SORE­NESS AND IT’S PER­FECTLY NOR­MAL FOR UP TO 72 HOURS POST-EX­ER­CISE – AL­THOUGH IF YOU COULD PRE­VENT IT, WHO WOULDN’T? HERE’S HOW THE PROS KICK IT TO THE CURB.

Dayna:

The best thing I have found is to drink L-glu­tamine and take a 30-minute hot bath with two cups of Ep­som salts – it takes the bruis­ing, swelling and wa­ter re­ten­tion out of your mus­cles.

Han­neké:

I usu­ally get DOMS in my legs and ide­ally a com­bi­na­tion of hot/cold ther­apy works best: an ice bath fol­lowed by a warm bath. It’s best to do it a few times.

Michelle W:

I usu­ally have DOMS in my shoul­ders, neck and up­per back and I nor­mally train through it. But if it feels ex­tremely un­com­fort­able, I’ll stop train­ing and rest and re­cover to pre­vent in­juries.

Michelle H:

I’ve found that it’s dif­fi­cult to treat DOMS ad­e­quately, but much eas­ier to pre­vent it in the first place. The mo­ment I started stretch­ing and foam rolling af­ter a work­out, I found that the DOMS went away.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.