Stri­dor

Your Baby & Toddler - - A-Z Guide -

Noisy breath­ing that is not due to another pass­ing ill­ness, such as cold or up­per res­pi­ra­tory tract in­fec­tion. There are two types: con­gen­i­tal stri­dor and acute stri­dor.

Con­gen­i­tal stri­dor is noisy breath­ing that is present, more or less, from birth. It will worsen un­til the age of three to six months, start to im­prove around 12 months and then dis­ap­pear around 18 months. Con­gen­i­tal stri­dor does not need any treat­ment if the child is feed­ing nor­mally and oth­er­wise com­pletely well.

Acute stri­dor is when a child sud­denly de­vel­ops noisy breath­ing. This is be­cause her air­way has be­come par­tially ob­structed, pos­si­bly due to an al­ler­gic re­ac­tion, croup (see “C”) or an ob­ject has be­come lodged in her throat. Acute stri­dor needs im­me­di­ate med­i­cal at­ten­tion be­cause the air­way ob­struc­tion could pre­vent your child from breath­ing and be­come lifethreat­en­ing.

Symp­toms

Harsh, vi­bra­tory sound when breath­ing

Treat­ment

Acute stri­dor re­quires ur­gent med­i­cal at­ten­tion. Doc­tors will treat the cause of the ob­struc­tion.

Con­gen­i­tal stri­dor re­quires no spe­cial treat­ment; it will re­solve it­self by 18 months. How­ever, it is ad­vis­able to see a doc­tor to en­sure it is noth­ing more se­ri­ous.

Al­ways see your doc­tor if stri­dor ac­com­pa­nies other signs of ill­ness, es­pe­cially fever.

ACUTE STRI­DOR IS WHEN A CHILD SUD­DENLY DE­VEL­OPS NOISY BREATH­ING

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