TAKE THE TRAUMA OUT OF TUMMY TIME

Your Baby & Toddler - - Your New Born -

START EARLY

The ear­lier you start tummy time, the bet­ter, and the more chance there is that your baby will en­joy it. So put your new­born on your chest. In this po­si­tion, the neck and back-strength­en­ing ben­e­fits of tummy time are gained.

PROP HER UP

For a slightly older baby, roll a tow­elling nappy un­der her chest to raise it up a lit­tle and make her more comfy. You can even use a breast­feed­ing cush­ion, a pil­low or a small 55cm gym ball. Lie your baby across one and roll her gen­tly over it from side to side and from back to front.

TIME IT RIGHT

Time her tummy time for af­ter naps and when she’s been fed – just not straight af­ter­wards. A con­tent baby is much more likely to co­op­er­ate and have fun on her tum than a fussy one.

BREAK IT UP

Do as much tummy time as your baby can tol­er­ate, and al­ter­nate tummy time with back time. Start with three to five min­utes three times a day and grad­u­ally build it up. Even­tu­ally, your baby should be able to do about 30 min­utes through­out the day, per­haps even more.

PLAY WITH HER

Dis­tract your baby from the fact that she’s on her tummy and get down on your tummy too. Make eye con­tact with her, play with her – blow bub­bles, play peeka-boo or read to her. If you’re busy, place her at your feet on a blan­ket with a mir­ror as ba­bies love look­ing at them­selves. Lots of toys scat­tered around to look at and reach for work well too. And don’t for­get about in­ter­ac­tive play­mats – a fab­u­lous buy.

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