HOW TO CALM YOUR IR­RI­TA­BLE BABY

Your Baby & Toddler - - Baby Files: Baby -

SWADDLE HER AND HOLD HER TIGHT

New­borns have a def­i­nite need to feel safe like they did in your womb. Hold your baby so that she can hear your heart­beat. It’s very re­as­sur­ing for ba­bies to ex­pe­ri­ence the same warmth they be­came used to for nine months.

SOOTH­ING SOUNDS

There are var­i­ous sounds that can have a calm­ing ef­fect on your baby. Try white noise by plac­ing her close to the wash­ing ma­chine or tum­ble drier. Sing lul­la­bies or play light clas­si­cal mu­sic. For most ba­bies, these sounds are re­as­sur­ing and can help calm them down.

MAS­SAGE YOUR BABY

Gen­tly mas­sag­ing your baby or lightly rub­bing her tummy or back might just do the trick. Touch is very ther­a­peu­tic for ba­bies. Try and find out where on her body she likes be­ing touched best.

LET HER SUCK ON SOME­THING

Many new­borns have a strong need to suck some­thing to pacify them. Try a dummy, your breast or even your fin­gers. Re­search shows that com­fort suck­ing keeps your baby’s heart rate con­stant and might even re­lax her tummy.

TAKE A WALK

Some­times all a baby needs is to get out of her usual en­vi­ron­ment. Put your baby in her pram and take a walk with her. A change of scenery can also help you re­lax.

GIVE YOUR­SELF A BREAK

Tak­ing care of a nig­gly baby is not child’s play and can be phys­i­cally and emo­tion­ally drain­ing. It’s im­por­tant to make time for your­self, be­cause if you’re tense, your baby can feel it. Ask your part­ner or a friend to take care of your baby once in a while and try to make time ev­ery day for an in­dul­gent bub­ble bath.

HOLD ON, THIS TOO SHALL PASS

To par­ent a cry­ing baby can be ex­haust­ing at the very least, but for­tu­nately for you and baby it won’t last for­ever. Cry­ing peaks by six weeks and starts sub­sid­ing con­sid­er­ably be­tween eight and 12 weeks, say those in the know. Be­fore you know it, ev­ery­thing will be bet­ter.

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