3 SIGNS YOU SHOULD WORRY

HOW CAN YOU TELL IF THE BUMP IS A LIT­TLE MORE SE­RI­OUS?

Your Baby & Toddler - - Baby Files: Toddler -

1. IF THE BUMP ON HIS HEAD GETS BIG­GER OVER HOURS OR DAYS OR YOUR TOT DE­VEL­OPS A TEM­PER­A­TURE “This sug­gests an un­der­ly­ing skull frac­ture and there is noth­ing spe­cific in terms of first aid that you can do. The best thing to do in this in­stance is to get your tod­dler to a doc­tor im­me­di­ately,” said Dr O’don­nell. She rec­om­mends go­ing to a med­i­cal fa­cil­ity with CAT scan fa­cil­i­ties. 2. IF HE FALLS OVER, DOESN’T CRY AND LOSES CON­SCIOUS­NESS AND/OR VOMITS MORE THAN THREE TIMES AFTER THE IN­JURY “Vom­it­ing after a head in­jury is very com­mon, but per­sis­tent vom­it­ing, re­gard­less of whether the child lost con­scious­ness or not, is con­sid­ered an in­di­ca­tor for a CAT scan as it can be a sign of in­creased pres­sure on the brain in­side the skull from bleed­ing or brain swelling,” she says. “Don’t force your child to eat or give them any­thing to stop vom­it­ing, just keep giv­ing them flu­ids – small amounts, and fre­quently. This can in­clude any sort of ‘wet’ foods, such as yo­ghurt, jelly, ice-pops, or fruit.” 3. IF YOU NO­TICE ANY DE­FOR­MI­TIES ON HIS LIMBS OR TEN­DER SWELLING ON HIS WRISTS Also keep an eye out for swelling above his el­bow or on his shoul­der line (col­lar bone). “If you see any swelling or de­for­mity on your child that you are un­sure about, you should have it as­sessed by a doc­tor. Th­ese can be any­thing from sim­ple bruises to frac­tured bones,” the doc­tor ad­vises.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.