AQUA­TOTS’ MARINDA LINDE LISTS THE LE­GION BEN­E­FITS SWIM­MING HAS ON YOUNG CHIL­DREN:

Your Baby & Toddler - - Features -

PHYS­I­CALLY swim­ming is good for mus­cle de­vel­op­ment and pos­ture, it helps de­velop the sense of pro­pri­o­cep­tion and bal­ance, is good for com­bat­ing obe­sity, im­proves cir­cu­la­tion, res­pi­ra­tion and gen­eral fit­ness, it’s good for co­or­di­na­tion and en­durance and for build­ing a range of mo­tion and it’s an im­pact-free form of ex­er­cise so it’s gen­tle on the joints too.

NEU­RO­LOG­I­CALLY

swim­ming is good for spa­tial and full body aware­ness, sen­sory in­te­gra­tion, and the de­vel­op­ment of all five senses, but specif­i­cally, it is a cross-pat­tern­ing form of ex­er­cise (where the body’s two halves mir­ror each other’s ac­tions), which pro­motes lots of nerve de­vel­op­ment in the cor­pus cal­lo­sum in the brain, which makes for bet­ter com­mu­ni­ca­tion across the two halves of the brain.

PSY­CHO­LOG­I­CALLY swim­ming re­duces anx­i­ety in the pool, builds con­fi­dence, is an emo­tional out­let, re­leases stress, is mo­ti­vat­ing and re­news en­ergy.

DE­VEL­OP­MEN­TALLY swim­ming teaches mo­tor learn­ing se­quenc­ing in a three-di­men­sional en­vi­ron­ment (wa­ter), where you can do a range of de­vel­op­men­tally ap­pro­pri­ate ac­tiv­i­ties in an en­vi­ron­ment of con­tin­u­ous learn­ing.

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