IN­TE­LI­GEN­CIA AR­TI­FI­CIAL VS. IN­TE­LI­GEN­CIA HU­MA­NA /

Ar­ti­fi­cial In­te­lli­gen­ce vs. Hu­man In­te­lli­gen­ce

AutoRevista - - Sumario -

Es­ta­mos an­te una fá­bri­ca muy in­ten­sa en una mez­cla de gran in­te­li­gen­cia con ro- bots, mo­de­los y Per­so­nas. ¿Dón­de es­tá el mi­mo? ¿En el pro­duc­to en sí, te­nien­do la ga­ran­tía del pro- ce­so con­tro­la­da en unos mí­ni­mos (ar­te­sa­nía)? a) ¿En la ga­ran­tía es­tric­ta de ca­da va­ria­ble de pro­ce­so (lo que su­po­ne 6sig­mas y más), y la re­vi­sión b) más li­via­na del pro­duc­to (fa­bri­ca­ción en se­rie más o me­nos lar­ga)? ¿En los mé­to­dos ana­lí­ti­cos más o me­nos in­te­li­gen­tes (fa­vo­re­ci­dos por el Big Da­ta) que me ayu­dan c)

en b (fa­bri­ca­ción di­gi­tal)? Ocu­rre lo si­guien­te: • pa­sa des­aper­ci­bi­do, pues hay un pro­ce­di­mien­to abu­rri­do que de­bo se­guir y que, en

En las se­ries, a) teo­ría, “lo ga­ran­ti­za ca­si to­do”. Eso, ya de por sí, de­va­lúa el mi­mo del pro­duc­to. • y va a ten­der a mi­nus­va­lo­rar­se. Ade­más, ca­da vez es más crí­ti­co el li­de­raz­go

b) es­tá en “sand­wich”

We are cu­rrently fa­cing a highly in­ten­si­ve form of fac­tory with a mix­tu­re of ad­van­ced in­te­lli­gen­ce by means of ro­bots, pro­toty­pes and peo­ple. But whe­re is the ca­re and at­ten­tion? In the pro­duct it­self, ha­ving the pro­cess gua­ran­tee con­tro­lled to a mi­ni­mum (crafts­mans­hip)? a) In the strict gua­ran­tee of each pro­cess va­ria­ble (what 6sig­ma and ot­hers sup­po­se), and in sim­pler pro­duct b) re­vi­sion (mo­re or less lar­ge-se­ries pro­duc­tion)? In analy­ti­cal met­hods with var­ying de­grees of in­te­lli­gen­ce (fa­vou­red by Big Da­ta) that help me in c)

b (di­gi­tal ma­nu­fac­tu­ring)? The fo­llo­wing thus oc­curs: • it goes un­no­ti­ced, as the pro­ce­du­re that must be fo­llo­wed is bo­ring and, in theory, “al­most

For se­ries, a) everyt­hing is gua­ran­teed”. That, in it­self, de­va­lues the ca­re and at­ten­tion of the pro­duct. • in bet­ween a and b and will ge­ne­rally be un­der­va­lued. In ad­di­tion, lea­ders­hip is in

b) it is sand­wi­ched

en el pro­ce­so de la Tec­no­lo­gía de Man­te­ni­mien­to y Fia­bi­li­dad, que hoy por hoy sal­vo ex­cep­cio­nes, no tie­ne gran ni­vel. Só­lo pue­de “em­pa­tar” (to­do ba­jo con­trol es un 5 de no­ta, un fa­llo es un ce­ro), y no des­pier­ta mu­chas vo­ca­cio­nes de al­ta cua­li­fi­ca­ción. No es “lu­ci­do”.

c), al­go muy pe­li­gro­so, por­que la com­ple­ji­dad real no ha­rá • Va a lle­gar una ex­ce­si­va con­fian­za en otra co­sa que cre­cer, y los mo­de­los ja­más la po­drán re­fle­jar. Sal­vo que nos ha­ga­mos más “sim­ples” y nos aco­ple­mos a ellos. Un ho­rror. • Las se­ries me­dias y gran­des, afor­tu­na­da­men­te pa­ra des­te­rrar el te­dio de la fá­bri­ca hu­ma­na, tien­den a des­apa­re­cer, por­que hay que di­fe­ren­ciar­se. Así que lo que hay que ver es có­mo ope­rar en a), b), c) en las se­ries cor­tas y uni­ta­rias. ¿Ar­te­sa­na­li­zar­las? ¿Apa­ren­te con­tra­dic­ción? Pa­ra­dó­ji­ca­men­te, con la ro­bo­ti­za­ción que con­si­gue la ma­ni­pu­la­bi­li­dad y su­ti­li­dad del bra­zo y mano, se ha­ce via­ble. Es­to es mu­cho más im­por­tan­te que crea­singly mo­re cri­ti­cal in the pro­cess of Re­lia­bi­lity and Main­te­nan­ce Tech­no­logy, which, to­day, with so­me ex­cep­tions, is not at a par­ti­cu­larly ad­van­ced le­vel. It can only re­sult in sta­le­ma­te (everyt­hing un­der con­trol is gra­ded a fi­ve, a fault is gra­ded a ze­ro), and it does not in­vol­ve many highly qua­li­fied pro­fes­sions. It is not “at­trac­ti­ve”. • so­met­hing that is very dan­ge­rous, be­cau­se the true com­ple­xity

Ex­ces­si­ve con­fi­den­ce will co­me in c), will do not­hing but grow, and the pro­toty­pes will ne­ver be able to re­flect it. Un­less we be­co­me mo­re “sim­ple” and we adapt, it will be a di­sas­ter. • Me­dium and lar­ge se­ries tend to di­sap­pear – for­tu­na­tely to help ba­nish the te­dium of the hu­man fac­tory – be­cau­se com­pa­nies must stand out. So, what must be exa­mi­ned is how to ope­ra­te in a), b), c) for uni­tary and short-se­ries pro­duc­tion. Is the ans­wer to re­vert to tra­di­tio­nal met­hods? Is that an ap­pa­rent con­tra­dic­tion? Pa­ra­do­xi­cally, it be­co­mes via­ble th­rough ro­bo­ti­sa­tion, which ma­na­ges to mi­mic the ma­ni­pu­la­bi­lity and subtlety of the arm and the

una in­te­li­gen­cia que ri­dí­cu­la­men­te imi­te al hom­bre. Pa­ra eso es­ta­mos no­so­tros. Si es así: • De­jo re­to­ques ar­te­sa­na­les fi­na­les a pro­pó­si­to. Se ha­rán con per­so­nas asis­ti­das por esos ro­bots avan­za­dos. En las se­ries uni­ta­rias es­to se ha­ce más fac­ti­ble, pe­ro en las cor­tas tam­bién, si sim­ple­men­te au­men­to la can­ti­dad re­la­ti­va de tra­ba­jo ro­bó­ti­co. • Los ope­ra­do­res son in­ge­nie­ros de con­jun­to que co­no­cen lo su­fi­cien­te e “hi­la­do” de pro­duc­to-pro ce­so-ca­li­dad y man­te­ni­mien­to. Re­sal­to la pa­la­bra “hi­la­do” Ro­tan fre­cuen­te­men­te en­tre ese tra­ba­jo ar­te­sa­nal en fa­bri­ca­ción y las la­bo­res pro­pias de in­ge­nie­ría, me­jo­ras y guía en el “hi­lo”. • La ar­te­sa­nía in­dus­tria­li­za­da per­mi­te via­bi­li­zar la fa­bri­ca­ción de pro­duc­tos re­la­ti­va­men­te ca­ros de no tan­to va­lor aña­di­do tec­no­ló­gi­co, y ha­cer­lo ade­más en paí­ses su­per­de­sa­rro­lla­dos. hand. This is much mo­re im­por­tant than a ty­pe of in­te­lli­gen­ce that ri­dicu­lously imi­ta­tes man (that’s what we are he­re for). If this is the ca­se: • Fi­nal ar­ti­sa­nal tweaks shall be left, to be per­for­med by peo­ple as­sis­ted by the­se ad­van­ced ro­bots. This is mo­re fea­si­ble for uni­tary pro­duc­tion, but al­so for short-se­ries pro­duc­tion if the re­la­ti­ve amount of ro­bot work is simply in­crea­sed. • Ope­ra­tors are en­gi­neers as a who­le who are suf­fi­ciently awa­re of the link bet­ween pro­duct-pro­cess-qua­lity and main­te­nan­ce, pa­ying spe­cial heed to the word “link”. They fre­quently al­ter­na­te bet­ween the afo­re­men­tio­ned ar­ti­sa­nal work in ma­nu­fac­tu­ring and tasks re­la­ted to en­gi­nee­ring, im­pro­ve­ments and gui­ding the se­ries. • In­dus­tria­li­sed crafts­mans­hip ma­kes the ma­nu­fac­tu­ring of re­la­ti­vely ex­pen­si­ve pro­ducts with not so

Las se­ries me­dias y gran­des, afor­tu­na­da­men­te pa­ra des­te­rrar el te­dio de la fá­bri­ca hu­ma­na, tien­den a des­apa­re­cer, por­que hay que di­fe­ren­ciar­se/ Me­dium and lar­ge se­ries tend to di­sap­pear – for­tu­na­tely to help ba­nish the te­dium of the hu­man fac­tory – be­cau­se com­pa­nies must stand out

• Ca­da día es di­fe­ren­te y no me abu­rro. Pe­ro el re­to es con­ver­tir a las Per­so­nas en in­ge­nie­ros po­li­va­len­tes a su ni­vel. Lo que, por otra par­te, es la úni­ca ma­ne­ra de que los hu­ma­nos no nos vea­mos re­em­pla­za­dos por las má­qui­nas que vie­nen. • En nues­tro ca­so par­ti­cu­lar, se re­cu­pe­ran las cos­tum­bres y la tra­di­ción ar­te­sa­nal y ar­tís­ti­ca es­pa­ño­las. ¿Dón­de de­be­rían que­dar las se­ries me­dias que no ten­gan inevi­ta­bles re­que­ri­mien­tos lo­ca­les? Pues lo ló­gi­co se­ría in­dus­tria­li­zar con ellas paí­ses del Ter­cer Mun­do que quie­ran mo­der­ni­zar­se y ten­gan las ga­nas y los mo­de­los de So­cie­dad mí­ni­ma­men­te ade­cua­dos. Po­ner plan­tas en ellos de for­ma coor­di­na­da con otras Em­pre­sas, Aso­cia­cio­nes y Go­bierno. No de­be asus­tar­nos es­to. Al con­tra­rio, es es­pe­ran­za de ca­mi­nos que afor­tu­na­da­men­te se abren pa­ra go­ber­nar lo que ya nos ace­cha. Se­rá sor­pre­si­vo, dis­rup­ti­vo, pe­li­gro­so y ex­cep­cio­nal, pe­ro pro­fun­da­men­te aven­tu­re­ro y di­ver­ti­do. much tech­no­lo­gi­cal ad­ded va­lue via­ble, even in highly de­ve­lo­ped coun­tries. • Every day is dif­fe­rent and not at all bo­ring. Ho­we­ver, the cha­llen­ge is to turn peo­ple in­to mul­ti-ski­lled en­gi­neers at their le­vel. This, in ad­di­tion, is the only way for hu­mans to not be re­pla­ced by the im­pen­ding ma­chi­nes. • In terms of Spain, Spa­nish ar­tis­tic and ar­ti­san tra­di­tions and cus­toms are thus re­cu­pe­ra­ted. Whe­re should me­dium se­ries that do not ha­ve ne­ces­sary lo­cal re­qui­re­ments go? Well, the lo­gi­cal thing would be to in­dus­tria­li­se them in tho­se Third World coun­tries that want to mo­der­ni­se and ha­ve mi­ni­mally ade­qua­te so­cie­tal mo­dels, and to set up fac­to­ries in said coun­tries in coor­di­na­tion with ot­her com­pa­nies, as­so­cia­tions and go­vern­ment. Ho­we­ver, we shouldn’t be alar­med by this. Qui­te on the con­trary, for it re­pre­sents ho­pe for paths that are for­tu­na­tely ope­ning up to help na­vi­ga­te what lies ahead of us. It will be sur­pri­sing and dis­rup­ti­ve but al­so ex­tre­mely th­ri­lling and en­jo­ya­ble.

El re­to es con­ver­tir a las Per­so­nas en in­ge­nie­ros po­li­va­len­tes a su ni­vel /The cha­llen­ge is to turn peo­ple in­to mul­ti-ski­lled en­gi­neers at their le­vel

Javier Bor­da Ele­ja­ba­rrie­ta PRO­FE­SOR, DOC­TOR IN­GE­NIE­RO Y PRE­SI­DEN­TE DE SIS­TE­PLANT/ PROFESSOR, DOC­TOR OF EN­GI­NEE­RING AND PRE­SI­DENT OF SIS­TE­PLANT

Los ope­ra­do­res son in­ge­nie­ros de con­jun­to que co­no­cen lo su­fi­cien­te e “hi­la­do” de pro­duc­to-pro­ce­so-ca­li­dad y man­te­ni­mien­to./ Ope­ra­tors are en­gi­neers as a who­le who are suf­fi­ciently awa­re of the link bet­ween pro­duct-pro­cess-qua­lity and main­te­nan­ce.

Newspapers in Spanish

Newspapers from Spain

© PressReader. All rights reserved.