Men­tal and Phys­i­cal Health, Es­sen­tial Com­ple­ments in Camino de Santiago

THE CON­JUNC­TION BE­TWEEN THE ROUTE OF VIA DE LA PLATA AND CAMINO FRANCES IN THE GALI­CIAN PROV­INCE OF OURENSE, IS THE ONE TRAV­EL­ERS MUST TAKE INTO CON­SID­ER­A­TION WHEN IT COMES TO TAKE GOOD CARE OF YOUR COM­FORT AND RE­GAIN YOUR EN­ERGY TO FACE THE REST OF THE T

Excelencias from the Caribbean & the Americas - - Historia / History - BY EMILIA PADÍN SIXTO PHO­TOS EX­CE­LEN­CIAS AR­CHIVES

Camino de Santiago is a mys­tic, his­toric, and mag­i­cal tour. And nowa­days, it can be also la­beled as so­cial. It has more than eight “of­fi­cial” routes, rec­og­nized by the Santiago Cathe­dral. And you can earn the ti­tle of Com­postela if you are able to do it on foot (min­i­mum of 100 km re­quired), on horse or bi­cy­cle (200 km), or a sail­boat (92 nau­ti­cal miles, 6+ km). All of these modal­i­ties have en­cour­aged more and more peo­ple to come and go on pil­grim­age to Santiago. With­out go­ing any fur­ther, a to­tal of 327,378 trav­el­ers ar­rive in the city in 2018, ac­cord­ing to of­fi­cial stats.

Of that to­tal, nearly 9,000 take Via de la Plata, for­mer Ro­man route that con­nected Merida with As­torga for 490 km. Today, this route in­vites vis­i­tors to do a pil­grim­age that con­nects Seville with Santiago de Com­postela, via Zafra, Merida, Cac­eres, Salamanca, and Zamora, 705km un­til As­torga, which merges later on with the route Camino Frances to the city of Apos­tol.

It is ex­actly this area —the con­junc­tion be­tween the route of Via de la Plata and Camino Frances in the Gali­cian prov­ince of Ourense— the one trav­el­ers must take into con­sid­er­a­tion when it comes to take good care of your com­fort and re­gain your en­ergy to face the rest of the trip. This is be­cause Ourense is a prov­ince rich in ther­mal and min­eral-medic­i­nal wa­ters and has a great of­fer of ther­mal spa.

The per­fect ex­am­ple is the Ro­man baths of Bande. Ac­cord­ing to lo­cal bathers, the wa­ter of these pools has very strong re­gen­er­a­tive prop­er­ties; and flows from deep in­side the Earth at 42 Cel­sius de­grees. It is not rec­om­mended to bathe for more than 10 min­utes to avoid hy­poten­sion; hence, we make sure these pe­ri­ods of time, mixed with a walk by the shore or the read­ing of a book, are enough to achieve the nec­es­sary re­lax­ation in be­tween the routes.

Many mod­ern trav­el­ers have their own plans to the last de­tail and do not have the chance to de­cide on other plans along the way. Con­se­quently, it is very im­por­tant to bear in mind the psy­cho­log­i­cal and phys­i­cal fa­tigue that comes af­ter so many kilo­me­ters on foot, horse, bi­cy­cle, or boat; and there­fore, to fore­see a re­lax­ation day in Ourense's ther­mal wa­ters.

Via de la Plata in­vites vis­i­tors to do a pil­grim­age that con­nects Seville with Santiago de Com­postela, via Zafra, Merida, Cac­eres, Salamanca, and Zamora, 705km un­til As­torga, which merges later on with the route Camino Frances to the city of Apos­tol

La provin­cia de Ourense cuenta con gran can­ti­dad de pisci­nas, pozas y fuentes ter­males nat­u­rales. Un ejem­plo son las ter­mas ro­manas de Bande, con­stru­idas para per­mi­tir a la legión esta­cionada en Aqua Querquen­sis el baño medic­i­nal. / The prov­ince of Ourense prof­its of sev­eral nat­u­ral ther­mal pools and springs. The per­fect ex­am­ple is the Ro­man baths of Bande. Built to al­low the le­gion set­tled in Aquis Querquen­nis to have a medic­i­nal bath.

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