DEHIWALA SUI­CIDE BOMBER

RAD­I­CALISED BY HATE PREACHER IN UK

Daily Mirror (Sri Lanka) - - CONTD. FROM -

I tried to rea­son with him. When I asked him how he got into this… he said that he at­tended the ser­mons of the rad­i­cal Bri­tish preacher An­jem Choudary in Lon­don. He said he met him dur­ing the ser­mons

A se­cu­rity of­fi­cial has told the BBC that sui­cide bomber Ab­dul Lathief Jameel Mo­hamed, was com­pletely rad­i­calised and sup­ported the ex­trem­ist ide­ol­ogy.

“I tried to rea­son with him. When I asked him how he got into this… he said that he at­tended the ser­mons of the rad­i­cal Bri­tish preacher An­jem Choudary in Lon­don. He said he met him dur­ing the ser­mons,” the se­cu­rity of­fi­cial said.

Choudary con­sid­ered one of the UK’S

most no­to­ri­ous hate preach­ers and fa­ther of five, spent three years of a five-and-a-half year sen­tence in prison.

He was de­tained in 2016 un­der ter­ror laws for his en­cour­age­ment to Mus­lims to join ISIS.THE Choudary-led ex­trem­ist group, al-muha­jiroun, was out­lawed by the govern­ment fol­low­ing the 2005 7/7 at­tacks on Lon­don but it has con­tin­ued to op­er­ate un­der a num­ber of dif­fer­ent im­ages.

He helped rad­i­calise some of Bri­tain’s most no­to­ri­ous ter­ror­ists, in­clud­ing Lon­don Bridge ter­ror at­tack ring­leader Khu­ram Butt, as well as Michael Ade­bo­lajo and Michael Ade­bowale, who mur­dered Fusilier Lee Rigby in Wool­wich, South-east Lon­don.

Mo­hamed tried to blow up the Taj Sa­mu­dra Ho­tel in Colombo on Easter Sun­day. But he is be­lieved to have botched his at­tempt to det­o­nate his bomb at the five-star ho­tel and is thought to have blown him­self up at a much smaller guest house in Dehiwala.

UK counter-ter­ror­ism in­ves­ti­ga­tors be­lieve he at­tended Kingston Univer­sity in South-west Lon­don from 2006-07, be­fore study­ing for a post­grad­u­ate de­gree in Mel­bourne, Aus­tralia.

In a pre­vi­ous in­ter­view with Mailon­line, his sis­ter Sam­sul Hi­daya said Ab­dul Lathief Jameel Mo­hamed had been ed­u­cated to the high­est level but be­came in­creas­ingly with­drawn and in­tense as he de­scended into ex­trem­ism.

‘My brother be­came deeply, deeply re­li­gious while he was in Aus­tralia,’ she said. ‘He was nor­mal when he went to study in Bri­tain, and nor­mal when he came back. But af­ter he did his post­grad­u­ate in Aus­tralia, he came back to Sri Lanka a dif­fer­ent man. He had a long beard and had lost his sense of hu­mour. He be­came se­ri­ous and with­drawn and would not even smile at any­one he didn’t know, let alone laugh.’ she said.

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