Daily Mirror (Sri Lanka)

Po­lit­i­cal, Se­cu­rity heads had am­ple time to stop Ter­ror at­tack : Fmr. Law and Or­der Sec­re­tary

Ad­di­tional Sec­re­taries ap­pointed to the Min­istry had no knowl­edge to lead the po­lice There were in­ter­nal is­sues at the Po­lice De­part­ment when is­su­ing the ar­rest war­rant on Zahran

- BY YOSHITHA PER­ERA Crime · Terrorism · Politics · White House National Security Council · UN Security Council · Nomura Holdings

Even though of­fi­cials had pre­vented them from dis­cussing mat­ters re­lated to Is­lamic ex­trem­ism at the Na­tional Se­cu­rity Coun­cil (NSC), the po­lit­i­cal and se­cu­rity heads had am­ple time to op­er­ate all pos­si­ble steps to de­ter the Easter Sun­day ter­ror at­tack within the re­main­ing 16 days of re­ceiv­ing ini­tial for­eign in­tel­li­gence on April 4, 2019, for­mer Sec­re­tary of Law and Or­der Min­istry Padamasiri Jaya­manne in­formed the PCOI prob­ing Easter Sun­day at­tacks.

Tes­ti­fy­ing be­fore the Com­mis­sion Jaya­manne said that the Se­cu­rity Coun­cil’s dis­cus­sions were largely lim­ited in the case of Is­lamic ex­trem­ism be­cause of the as­sis­tance re­ceived by the for­mer gov­ern­ment from the mi­nor­ity par­ties .

“De­spite all these mi­nor­ity po­lit­i­cal in­flu­ences,the au­thor­i­ties should have taken all pos­si­ble steps within the re­main­ing 16 days af­ter re­ceiv­ing the ini­tial for­eign in­tel­li­gence re­gard­ing a pos­si­ble ter­ror at­tack,”he said.

For­mer Sec­re­tary Jaya­manne said that he had par­tic­i­pated at the NSC for ten months and by that time the Se­cu­rity Coun­cil was aware of the fact that Zahran was nur­tur­ing the IS ide­ol­ogy and spread­ing Is­lamic ex­trem­ism in the coun­try.

Jaya­manne added that al­though he thought NSC was an im­por­tant de­ci­sion maker at a high level,the meet­ings which were con­ducted at the pre­vi­ous Se­cu­rity Coun­cil were not in such state.

He also added that even the re­ports sub­mit­ted by the State In­tel­li­gence Ser­vice (SIS) to the NSC were not up to stan­dard.

“I ob­served that the in­tel­li­gence re­ports I re­ceived were not up to stan­dard.i also re­alised that I could not take nec­es­sary steps based on those in­tel­li­gence re­ports.once the SIS sent a report men­tion­ing that Zahran was hid­ing in his wife’s house in Keku­nagolla af­ter is­su­ing the ar­rest war­rant.those are nor­mal in­ci­dents which have to be re­ported to the Po­lice in the par­tic­u­lar area to take ac­tion.i also no­ticed that there were lots of typo’s on the facts men­tioned in these re­ports,”he said.

The wit­ness fur­ther in­formed sev­eral facts per­tain­ing to the Min­istry of Law and Or­der and the Po­lice De­part­ment. He said that the Ad­di­tional Sec­re­taries ap­pointed to the Min­istry had no knowl­edge to lead the po­lice. Jaya­manne also added that there were in­ter­nal is­sues at the Po­lice De­part­ment when is­su­ing the ar­rest war­rant on Zahran Hashim and due to those in­ter­nal is­sues the of­fi­cials were un­able to check on Zahran’s ar­rest war­rant. The Com­mis­sion­ers then ques­tioned the wit­ness to clar­ify what kind of in­ter­nal is­sues pre­vailed at the Po­lice De­part­ment.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Sri Lanka