Not such a small­room

Bangkok indie la­bel flexes its mus­cles

Bangkok Post - - Outlook -

Over the years, the small­room la­bel has churned out an army of top qual­ity artists. Be­ing one of the few in­de­pen­dent la­bels still op­er­at­ing, small­room has scored both hits and suf­fered misses, but in an at­tempt to con­firm its place in the lo­cal indie Hall of Fame, the la­bel is stag­ing its first ma­jor show­case of its ros­ter of artists, ‘‘An­other Sound in the Room’’, on Oc­to­ber 8.

The con­cert will fea­ture the bright young things of to­day’s mu­sic. Death of a Sales­man, Goose, Lemon Soup and Slur have been se­lected to serve up hot dishes of an­other side of small­room.

‘‘Peo­ple nor­mally as­so­ci­ate small­room with twee or Swedish pop, but in fact we have all kind of sounds in our stable. So we want to dis­play an­other fac­tor that makes small­room whole: The rock­ier, the more ex­per­i­men­tal part. Th­ese four bands pos­sess unique sounds that also rep­re­sent small­room,’’ said la­bel founder Rungroj Up­pa­tumpoti­wat.

The vet­er­ans would be Death of a Sales­man, who have been around longer than any­one else on the bill. Chat­u­ravidh Chat­ta­l­ada and Prin Amorn­su­pasiri’s 2003 de­but album is now recog­nised as one of the most in­no­va­tive and dar­ing re­leases of the decade, thanks to its eclec­tic, ec­cen­tric pop-rock. Muchloved among indie mu­sic scen­esters and the al­ter­na­tive me­dia,

Death of a Sales­man pro­vide a dif­fer­ent ex­pe­ri­ence live as they charge the au­di­ence with a raw en­ergy and spaced-out noise pop in­ferno. Though the boys haven’t re­leased any­thing new for three years and have mostly faded from the scene, their first gig in many months should sig­nal their come­back.

Goose’s live shows should no longer need per­sua­sion. It’s al­most like tak­ing pic­tures with the tanks. You know Goose is heavy stuff that you shouldn’t mess with, but you want to be there any­way. With their sec­ond album, 20 Guns Point­ing in Your Face, cre­at­ing a buzz among mu­sic lovers, the post rock/shoegaz­ing quin­tet have be­come an all-time favourite with non-main­stream con­cert pro­mot­ers. Chatty, sweet lads in real life, Goose cater to a more gloomy side of ex­per­i­men­tal rock a la Sigur Ros and Ra­dio­head. Their live shows are spell­bind­ing and ca­pa­ble of lur­ing the au­di­ence into a hyp­notic, con­tem­pla­tive sound­scape.

Lemon Soup are some­how less com­pli­cated. Their earnest col­lege rock sounds have proven to be a hit with many. Formed at Chu­la­longkorn Univer­sity, Lemon Soup play with the hearts and souls of vet­eran tune­smiths even if they are still con­sid­ered rook­ies on stage. With a hit song Rawang Tang (On the Way) mak­ing its mark, it’s time to see whether there’s a lemon in this soup.

Last but not least are the youngest of them all, Slur. If hype is looked upon as a bad thing, Slur, touted to be one of the big­gest bands this year, are one of a few trendy groups that could change your per­cep­tion. Garage rock re­vival­ists may be noth­ing to swoon at, but Slur do it with such oomph and fit­ting melodies that it be­comes too hard not to shake your bits along. First sin­gle, Rok Jit (Psy­cho), is cur­rently num­ber one in Fat Ra­dio’s chart while the album is due to be re­leased in a mat­ter of weeks. As a bonus, Slur al­ways dress to im­press when they go on stage!

‘‘An­other Sound in the Room’’ has also com­mis­sioned cut­ting edge vis­ual artists, B.O.R.E.D and Duct­store to col­lab­o­rate for the first time.

So, if you’re a mu­sic fan, have re­funded your Rob­bie Wil­liams ticket and tired of catch­ing ex­cit­ing bands at ram­shackle venues, here’s your chance to be a part of this not so small­room.

Slur

Death of a Sales­man

Lemon Soup

Goose ‘An­other Sound in the Room’, with Death of a Sales­man, Goose, Lemon Soup and Slur is on Oc­to­ber 8 at Moon­star Stu­dio 1, Meng Jai. Tick­ets cost 300 baht each and are now on sale at tha­i­tick­et­mas­ter.com. Call 02-714-4423 for more in­for­ma­tion.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Thailand

© PressReader. All rights reserved.