Cap­tain Til­mann Gabriel of­fers views on sus­tain­abil­ity

Aviation Business - - CONTENTS -

Cap­tain Til­mann Gabriel, di­rec­tor of City, Uni­ver­sity of Lon­don’s MSc aviation man­age­ment pro­grammes and ex­ec­u­tive chair­man of the In­ter­na­tional Pi­lot Train­ing As­so­ci­a­tion, gives his views on the three key trends he sees shap­ing to­day’s busi­ness aviation mar­ket.

Busi­ness aviation is still grow­ing strong, last year by 12%, fore­cast­ing some 22,000 busi­ness air­craft glob­ally by 2023. Europe may cool down fur­ther due to the Brexit threat and with much of the busi­ness air­craft op­er­a­tors and bro­kers based in the UK. An­other world­wide threat is the lack of pi­lots. With a de­mand of 110 new pi­lots per day for the next 20 years to fly the ex­pected air­liner air­craft pro­duc­tion, which is mostly al­ready sold, the busi­ness air­craft op­er­a­tors will need to find mod­els to re­cruit and re­tain a share of these pi­lots.

The change in the ed­u­ca­tional reg­u­la­tions of pi­lots (and air­craft en­gi­neers) to­wards com­pe­tency-based train­ing and as­sess­ment will be a chal­lenge for busi­ness air­craft op­er­a­tors and its train­ing providers, due to the com­plex­ity and the in­di­vid­u­al­ity of train­ing for each pi­lot.

Brexit

If, at the time of pub­li­ca­tion, the UK has left the EU without a deal, we have a com­plete sep­a­ra­tion of the CAA and the UK ter­ri­tory from the EU27. EU27 regis­tered air­craft can no longer fly without ap­provals within the UK (Cab­o­tage) and all flights in and out of the UK have to be ap­proved by the CAA. They are giv­ing three to nine months block ap­provals if cer­tain con­di­tions are met.

They will also es­tab­lish a CAA Third Coun­try Op­er­a­tor per­mit (TCO), sim­i­lar to EASA , and all op­er­a­tors fly­ing into the UK will have to hold such CAA TCO per­mit. A lot of un­cer­tainty ex­ists around the EASA pi­lot and other li­censes. If the CAA re­mains a ‘third coun­try work­ing group mem­ber’ of EASA there might be very few changes, but with a hard Brexit, the Euro­pean Coun­cil has sig­nalled that EASA is no longer re­spon­si­ble for the UK and all its reg­u­la­tions and stan­dard li­cens­ing.

This will have con­se­quences for the com­mer­cial busi­ness aviation com­mu­nity in the EU. Pri­vate busi­ness air­craft flights (owner on-board) are not af­fected, but for the com­mer­cial busi­ness air­craft op­er­a­tors many new re­quire­ments will come into ef­fect this month.

Sus­tain­abil­ity

Re­cently, there is an in­creas­ing dis­cus­sion on the CO2 emis­sions of all air­craft, but also busi­ness jets. The dis­cus­sion around the Duke and Duchess of Es­sex us­ing a pri­vate jet is one ex­am­ple. The Swedish ac­tivist Greta Thun­berg started a move­ment, es­pe­cially among young peo­ple fly­ing to city and beach va­ca­tions sev­eral times a year. Global warm­ing might be de­nied by a few, the causal ef­fects of CO2 emis­sions ques­tioned.

How­ever, the in­creas­ing im­por­tance of sus­tain­abil­ity-fo­cused po­lit­i­cal par­ties (the green par­ties) and their suc­cess in elec­tions be­com­ing sec­ond largest par­ties and of­ten en­ter­ing the gov­ern­ment in coali­tions, will likely lead to a change of poli­cies. This could im­pact air­ports, open­ing hours, sus­tain­abil­ity reg­u­la­tions, CO2 emis­sion lim­its and trad­ing, which could af­fect the growth of the air­line in­dus­try in Europe and the rel­a­tive ease of oper­a­tion for busi­ness jets.

With a de­mand of 110 new pi­lots per day for the next 20 years to fly the ex­pected air­liner air­craft pro­duc­tion, which is mostly al­ready sold, the busi­ness air­craft op­er­a­tors will need to find mod­els to re­cruit and re­tain a share of these pi­lots”

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