Se­cu­rity ser­vices en­able part­ners to help plug the holes in cus­tomer net­works >>

Net­work se­cu­rity-fo­cused chan­nel part­ners are in a good po­si­tion to help cus­tomers re­con­sider how they plan to stay ahead of the crim­i­nal com­mu­nity that wants to steal, hi­jack or ran­som their data.

Channel Middle East - - // Introduction -

Cy­ber­crim­i­nals by def­i­ni­tion don’t play by the rules. They aren’t con­strained by org-chart-di­a­grammed lines of busi­ness, care­fully guarded net­work do­mains, nar­rowly de­ployed se­cu­rity so­lu­tions or com­part­men­talised tech­nol­ogy teams. They look at your cus­tomer’s net­work as a sin­gle en­tity and will take every op­por­tu­nity for lat­eral move­ment.

That means they may have bet­ter vis­i­bil­ity into an or­gan­i­sa­tion’s net­work op­er­a­tions and ar­chi­tec­ture than many of the folks who ac­tu­ally work there.

This “silo ef­fect” is dan­ger­ous. It’s also way too preva­lent in the Mid­dle East now.

As cy­ber­se­cu­rity needs have evolved, or­gan­i­sa­tions have de­ployed one-off se­cu­rity so­lu­tions in dif­fer­ent ar­eas of the net­work and cloud in­fra­struc­ture that of­ten re­quire in­di­vid­ual man­age­ment. As a re­sult, threat in­tel­li­gence is iso­lated, so de­tect­ing so­phis­ti­cated at­tacks re­quires the sort of man­ual cor­re­la­tion that most or­gan­i­sa­tions sim­ply do not have the re­sources to sup­port. For man­aged se­cu­rity providers (MSPs), the man­date is to break down these walls and pro­vide in­te­grated se­cu­rity so­lu­tions.

That’s why se­cu­rity-fo­cused chan­nel part­ners are in a good po­si­tion to help cus­tomers re­con­sider how they plan to stay ahead of the crim­i­nal com­mu­nity that wants to steal, hi­jack or ran­som their data. You are an im­par­tial, out­side observer who may see schisms that the com­pany doesn’t even re­alise may be put­ting its data at risk.

Once you get their at­ten­tion, there are four steps to be­gin im­ple­ment­ing ef­fec­tive se­cu­rity ser­vices that help bridge the gap be­tween tra­di­tion­ally iso­lated se­cu­rity de­vices. These in­clude tech­nol­ogy in­te­gra­tion, uni­fied in­tel­li­gence, con­sis­tent ap­pli­ca­tion of ser­vices and process au­to­ma­tion.

When you of­fer a uni­form set of se­cu­rity ser­vices that spans your cus­tomers’ ecosys­tem of net­works, they can tie dif­fer­ent and dis­parate se­cu­rity so­lu­tions to­gether even fur­ther. These ser­vices, such as sand­box­ing, in­tru­sion pre­ven­tion, viru­sout­break pre­ven­tion or ap­pli­ca­tion con­trols, al­low you as a part­ner and trusted se­cu­rity ad­vi­sor to use a com­mon set of in­tel­li­gence and tech­niques to bet­ter iden­tify, cor­re­late and re­spond to threats in a co­or­di­nated fash­ion, re­gard­less of where a threat is de­tected or where se­cu­rity re­sources are lo­cated at the the time of at­tack.

Cy­ber­crime has evolved faster than the typ­i­cal piece­meal se­cu­rity strat­egy can de­fend against it. Wide-reach­ing knowl­edge of the at­tack land­scape and the abil­ity to re­spond quickly at mul­ti­ple lev­els are the only ways to pro­vide the level of se­cu­rity needed now. By pro­vid­ing such ser­vices, you will en­sure con­sis­tent en­force­ment and se­cu­rity ef­fec­tive­ness, re­gard­less of how com­plex your cus­tomers’ net­work en­vi­ron­ments may be. In this Spe­cial Re­port on Net­work Se­cu­rity, I would like to ex­tend my grat­i­tude to ESET for be­ing the Knowl­edge Part­ner and for shar­ing some in­dus­try per­spec­tives on how net­works of elec­tri­cal grids and smart home ap­pli­ances could make for a dan­ger­ous mix.

Manda Banda

Edi­tor, Chan­nel Mid­dle East

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