In­done­sia sifts through plane de­bris

The crashed Lion Air Boe­ing-737 MAX went into ser­vice just a few months ago

Gulf News - - World -

In­done­sia or­dered the in­spec­tion of all Boe­ing 737-MAX air­lin­ers yes­ter­day as res­cue teams re­cov­ered more hu­man re­mains from a brand new Lion Air jet that plunged into the sea with 189 peo­ple on board.

On a Jakarta dock­side, of­fi­cials took up the grim task of sep­a­rat­ing hu­man re­mains from plane de­bris and re­cov­ered per­sonal ef­fects, send­ing the body parts — in­clud­ing from an in­fant — to hospi­tal for DNA test­ing.

The Boe­ing-737 MAX, which went into ser­vice just a few months ago, crashed into the Java Sea off In­done­sia’s north­ern coast mo­ments af­ter it had asked to re­turn to Jakarta on Mon­day.

Flight JT610 sped up as it sud­denly lost al­ti­tude and then van­ished from radar 12 min­utes af­ter take-off, with wit­nesses say­ing the sin­gle-aisle jet plunged into the wa­ter.

The ac­ci­dent has res­ur­rected con­cerns about In­done­sia’s patchy air safety record which led to a now-lifted ban on its planes en­ter­ing US and Euro­pean airspace.

Yes­ter­day, In­done­sia’s trans­port min­is­ter or­dered an in­spec­tion of all 737-MAX air­craft but he stopped short of ground­ing the new mod­els.

Au­thor­i­ties are try­ing to pin­point the smashed jet’s lo­ca­tion and flight data recorders ex­pected to be cru­cial to the crash in­ves­ti­ga­tion.

AP

Res­cuers ex­am­ine parts of the crashed Lion Air plane. The ac­ci­dent has res­ur­rected con­cerns about In­done­sia’s patchy air safety record.

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