JADE JONES

Jade Jones-Hall is a GB para­triath­lete, wheel­chair marathon racer and an Ev­ery­one Ac­tive Sport­ing Cham­pion. Here’s how she gets ahead in para­tri

220 Triathlon Magazine - - CONTENTS -

1 FO­CUS ON TECH­NIQUE

The swim and the rac­ing chair el­e­ments of a triathlon are ma­jorly tech­ni­cal. Strength will only get you so far in these and so fo­cus­ing on get­ting tech­nique right will speed up your pro­gres­sion. I’m still pretty new to swim­ming, so I plan spe­cific drills into my swim sets to fo­cus on the dif­fer­ent phases of the stroke (breath­ing, the catch, kick­ing, etc), to max­imise my ef­fi­ciency through the water.

2 LEARN HOW TO FIX KIT

As well as a bike, we use a rac­ing chair for the run sec­tion, so there are two pieces of equip­ment. The bike and chair al­most be­come an ex­ten­sion of your body when you’re com­pet­ing. They play a huge role in your per­for­mance, es­pe­cially as a dis­abled ath­lete. Know­ing how they work and how to fix them is go­ing to be in­cred­i­bly use­ful. Com­ing from an ath­let­ics back­ground, I know my rac­ing chair re­ally well, whereas the bike is newer to me, so I’m al­ways look­ing to learn more.

3 YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN

Con­sis­tency in training is key for pro­gres­sion in any sport. Plan­ning your training week, with spe­cific goals and key ses­sions will help you stay on track, to hit your tar­gets. Make sure you also plan in re­cov­ery time, as this can be just as im­por­tant as the training it­self.

4 SUR­ROUND YOUR­SELF WITH POS­I­TIVE PEO­PLE

These are the ones that will help push you when you need it and sup­port you when you need it. Hav­ing a pos­i­tive training en­vi­ron­ment has a mas­sive im­pact on per­for­mance. I train with my hus­band, Cal­lum Hall, so that gives me a great training en­vi­ron­ment, along with some healthy ri­valry to push me through hard ses­sions.

5 ASK QUES­TIONS

Some­times it’s the ‘bad’ races that you learn the most from. I’m still learn­ing in ev­ery ses­sion and race that I do. I’m learn­ing about my­self, and about my com­peti­tors and their strengths and weak­nesses; so, ask lots of ques­tions to see what other peo­ple’s ex­pe­ri­ences are!

6 EN­JOY IT

I started sports when I was 12 be­cause I fell in love with wheel­chair rac­ing. Sport is fun, and some­times this el­e­ment can be lost when striv­ing for re­sults, par­tic­u­larly when the re­sults don’t come. Don’t lose sight of why you’re here and why you started sport in the first place. En­joy ev­ery sec­ond of it.

BRI­TISH TRIATHLON

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