11 OP­TI­MISE YOUR LIGHT­ING SETUP IN ARCH VIS

rather than con­cen­trate on set­tings or pa­ram­e­ters, at oxy­gen they fol­low an in­duc­tive process to set up the light­ing ac­cord­ing to real-world ref­er­ences

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01

Light bal­ance In order to bal­ance light­ing quickly and ef­fec­tively, we gen­er­ally start by as­sign­ing a neu­tral grey Vray­over­ridemtl ma­te­rial to every ob­ject in the scene. This helps us to quickly see if the light­ing is con­sis­tent with the ge­om­e­try of the project. Once this is fin­ished, we re­as­sign the ac­tual ma­te­ri­als and re­fine the light­ing scheme.

03

Cam­era Set­ting up your V-ray cam­era prop­erly is an im­por­tant part of light­ing a scene. Find the best cam­era an­gle pos­si­ble and keep as close as you can to as­pect ra­tios used in real-world pho­tog­ra­phy. Of­ten the key to this kind of light­ing work­flow is to change the HDRI as lit­tle as pos­si­ble and build your cam­era set­tings around it.

02

Con­trast Al­ways keep in mind the cor­rect hi­er­ar­chy be­tween light in­ten­sity and colour tem­per­a­ture. To get more con­trast, we usu­ally play with the gamma set­ting of the VRAYHDRI map. A lower value will give more con­trast, which means a big­ger dif­fer­ence be­tween light and shadow, and colours be­come more sat­u­rated.

04

Con­cept and ref­er­ences Good pho­to­graphic ref­er­ences are cru­cial to achieve a good light­ing scheme. The closer you get to the real world, the bet­ter it will be. Make sure to re­pro­duce the nat­u­ral be­hav­iour of light in order to un­der­stand how the light is set, how it bounces off ob­jects, how it casts shad­ows and what the colour of those shad­ows are.

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