27 Ways to Build Bet­ter Arch Viz

Lead­ing in­dus­try ex­perts gives us some of their top tips for cre­at­ing in­ter­nal and ex­ter­nal ar­chi­tec­ture vi­su­als

3D Artist - - CONTENTS -

Top tips for up­grad­ing your vi­su­al­i­sa­tions

An in­dus­try which has been rev­o­lu­tionised by 3D de­sign soft­ware over the last cou­ple of decades is un­doubt­edly ar­chi­tec­ture. Where once a creative would brief clients with a 2D image or a scale model, now a liv­ing, breath­ing, 3D rep­re­sen­ta­tion can be cre­ated that’s per­fect right down to ev­ery con­ceiv­able de­tail.

From build­ings that are per­fectly to scale, to in­te­rior de­signs re­plete with nu­ances such as scratches and other re­al­is­tic fea­tures, the pos­si­bil­i­ties for re­al­ism are al­most end­less.

But un­like some other as­pects of de­sign, ar­chi­tec­ture vi­su­al­i­sa­tion is per­haps unique in that ev­ery­thing ev­ery­thing de­signed and cre­ated has to look like it would be able to ex­ist in the real world. Over the com­ing pages, some of the in­dus­try’s lead­ing ex­perts share their in­sights on how to cre­ate ar­chi­tec­ture vi­su­al­i­sa­tions that leap off the page and into the cities of the fu­ture.

01 TAR­GET AND PLAN DE­TAILS

Build what you want to see. For this con­cept, tar­get your ideas. Pri­ori­tise what will im­pact your image most be­fore div­ing into the most ba­sic of set dress­ing. Ceil­ings are oddly ex­pres­sive within an image, for both clut­ter and de­tail. Of­ten times a ren­der­ing looks more to­wards the ceil­ing than the in­te­rior lay­out be­cause the in­te­ri­ors are seen by ex­te­rior cam­eras as well as clients gen­er­ally re­quest­ing wider views which in­clude more floor and ceil­ing than a typ­i­cal DSLR image would cap­ture. Corey Beaulieu

02 PLAN LAY­OUTS FROM TOP-DOWN VIEW

Plan your lay­outs from a top-down view. Noth­ing makes more sense vis­ually than a room that makes sense spa­tially. If you try to place fur­ni­ture from your cam­era there will al­ways be some­thing ‘off’ about the image. Plac­ing set dress­ing based on the plan be­fore find­ing your cam­eras will al­low you to act as more of a pho­tog­ra­pher than a dig­i­tal artist. Corey Beaulieu

03 KEEP TRACK OF ARTIST TIME VS MA­CHINE TIME

Al­ways con­sider your artist time as a com­par­i­son to ma­chine time. We all want op­ti­mal scenes, mon­e­tised pro­jects, and our best work, but we of­ten get bogged down on best ren­der set­tings, best tool for the job, etc. Con­sider the best tool for the job mixed with the artist vs ma­chine time and op­ti­mise your project. Corey Beaulieu

04 UNLEASH RE­AL­ISM WITH PHOTOGRAMMETRY AS­SETS

Photogrammetry as­sets, such as the ones found in Quixel’s Me­gas­can li­brary, me­gas­cans.se, can add an ob­scene amount of de­tail to your scenes, but care should be taken when pre­par­ing them. Make sure you use the right LOD mesh to get the most out of them from shot to shot while min­imis­ing me­mory foot­print. Jerry Chen

05 SET DRESS­ING

Don’t just ran­domly place ob­jects in the scene, try to think of them as part of a story. When work­ing with in­te­rior vi­su­al­i­sa­tion I al­ways try to imag­ine, what kind of per­son would live there, and place ob­jects ac­cord­ingly. Alex Lan­gletz

06 RE­SEARCH

In some sit­u­a­tions a de­signer might only pro­vide a ba­sic sketch of their vi­sion. Adding props and ac­ces­sories to a space is a great way to bring an image to life, but done badly can also ruin an image. Re­search how rooms are styled. Pinterest is a great re­source for find­ing prop in­spi­ra­tion. Adam Wood­ward

07 TELL A GOOD STORY, DON’T ADD A MIL­LION PEO­PLE

Cre­ate one main nar­ra­tive that you can at­tach to your im­agery. It’s very im­por­tant to en­gage and sur­prise your view­ers with a clear story, al­ways keep­ing a pur­pose. Fredy Castel­lanos

08 BUILD UP DEPTH

To avoid cre­at­ing a flat, one-di­men­sional image, you must al­ways con­sider depth. Com­po­si­tion­ally, there are three lev­els of depth, so think about how to break up your image into back, mid­dle and fore­ground. Fredy Castel­lanos

09 SCALE MAT­TERS

In­tro­duc­ing 3D peo­ple, or a box which sim­u­lates a per­son’s height in a scene, can rad­i­cally change the per­cep­tion of a space and how pro­por­tions get read. Fredy Castel­lanos

10 SE­LEC­TIVE COLOUR AD­JUST­MENT

I do this by ab­stract­ing each as­pect of the image. Use a 50% Grey Solid on Lu­mi­nos­ity blend mode in com­bi­na­tion with a Hue Sat­u­ra­tion set to 100% sat­u­rated in order to see the colour cast of your image and bet­ter match to your tones. Corey Beaulieu

11 SUR­FACE IM­PER­FEC­TIONS

Even if it’s a ‘clean’ scene, small de­tails like slightly break­ing up re­flec­tions with a dirt map or adding sub­tle scratches on sur­faces, help to make the ren­der more re­al­is­tic. Alex Lan­gletz

12 TIME AL­LO­CA­TION FOR MA­TE­RI­AL­ITY

Match your time spent on each ma­te­rial with how much it con­trib­utes to the image. If your image is 40 per cent mar­ble, then spend 40 per cent of the time al­lot­ted for ma­te­ri­als on the mar­ble. Try not to get lost in the minu­tiae of ma­te­ri­al­ity. Overly-com­pli­cated ma­te­ri­als cre­ate un­nec­es­sar­ily high ren­der times with low or no im­pact to the image. Corey Beaulieu

13 UTIL­IS­ING VRAYCURVATURE FOR TEX­TU­RAL COM­PLEX­ITY

An al­ter­na­tive to us­ing Sub­stance Pain­ter to add wear and tear to cor­ners of your ge­om­e­try is through Vraycurvature map. This pro­ce­dural tex­ture is built into V-ray 3.0 and can add ex­tra level of re­al­ism when used in con­junc­tion with a Com­pos­ite or Mix map. Jerry Chen

14 CRE­ATE NAT­U­RAL GROWTH PAT­TERNS IN FOR­EST PACK PRO

Due to the way they prop­a­gate, the same species of plants of­ten grow to­gether in groups. Sim­u­late this ef­fect in For­est Pack by en­abling the Clus­ters fea­ture found in the Dis­tri­bu­tion roll­out. Paul roberts

Park Place, May­fair by SHH Black tim­ber house by State of Art Stu­dio

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