VI­SU­AL­I­SA­TION AND V-RAY

V-ray is an in­te­gral part of vi­su­al­i­sa­tion. Lon Grohs, CCO of Chaos Group, ex­plains why that is

3D Artist - - VISUALISING THE FUTURE -

YOU’VE BEEN AROUND FOR QUITE SOME TIME. HOW HAS ARCH VIZ CHANGED OVER THE COURSE OF THE COM­PANY’S EX­IS­TENCE?

For the long­est time there was a push to­wards pho­to­re­al­ism. Once achieved, the next wave be­came real-time and do­ing more with your de­sign in­ter­ac­tively. We are fi­nally at a point where both tracks are op­er­at­ing in tan­dem, so artists can get im­me­di­ate feed­back through real-time with­out giv­ing up the abil­ity to call up pho­to­re­al­is­tic ren­der­ing when­ever they need it.

IF YOU COULD PICK ONE DEFIN­ING THING ABOUT CHAOS GROUP AND V-RAY, WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IT WAS THAT HELPED TO MAKE IT SUCH AN IN­TE­GRAL PART OF ARCH VIZ?

V-ray is re­ally a Swiss Army knife. When it comes to de­sign­ers and arch-viz artists, they are gen­er­al­ists at heart. They are asked to do a lot of things: build the model, make the ma­te­ri­als, set up light­ing, do the ren­der­ing… and that’s where V-ray comes through for them be­cause it was de­signed to be a jack-of-all-trades. As part of that, it also of­fers artists the best path to pho­to­re­al­ism. It gives you all of the things you need to be suc­cess­ful in that re­gard: ac­cu­rate GI, ray-traced re­flec­tions and ma­te­ri­als, and mas­sive data sets. So you have gen­er­a­tions of artists who grew up know­ing that no mat­ter what you throw at V-ray, it would al­ways be de­pend­able.

HOW DOES V-RAY AS­SIST ARCH-VIZ DE­SIGN­ERS?

In ad­di­tion to be­ing a Swiss Army knife and be­ing able to cre­ate stills, an­i­ma­tions and VR, it’s also your bridge to get­ting to real-time vi­su­al­i­sa­tions sim­ply and eas­ily. For ex­am­ple, with the launch of V-ray for Un­real, any­one who cre­ates a V-ray scene in­side their favourite V-ray ap­pli­ca­tion, can now im­port that scene into Un­real us­ing V-ray Light Bak­ing to dis­play the most re­al­is­tic real-time ver­sion of that scene as fast as pos­si­ble.

DO YOU DE­VELOP YOUR TOOLS AND SOFT­WARE WITH ARCH VIZ IN MIND AND, IF SO, HOW?

Ab­so­lutely. Ar­chi­tec­ture has been a driv­ing force for us for over 20 years, so we are highly ded­i­cated to the com­mu­nity and its in­ter­ests, whether that’s through V-ray or Corona Ren­derer, which we ac­quired in 2017. By of­fer­ing both, we can tai­lor our so­lu­tions to two dif­fer­ent needs – ver­sa­til­ity and sim­plic­ity – and artists can pick the one that works best for them. Sim­plic­ity is a com­mon theme in arch viz re­gard­less of the prod­uct, which is one rea­son why we com­pletely sim­pli­fied the UI of V-ray for Re­vit, Rhino and Sketchup.

WITH THE IN­CREAS­ING POP­U­LAR­ITY OF VR IN ARCH VIZ – AT LEAST ON THE CLIENT SIDE – CAN YOU EN­VI­SION A TIME WHEN REAL-TIME EN­GINES LIKE UN­REAL WILL DOM­I­NATE THE ARCH-VIZ IN­DUS­TRY?

Real-time and ar­chi­tec­ture be­long to­gether. It’s one of the main rea­sons we de­vel­oped V-ray for Un­real – there’s a lot of power in a joint work­flow. It’s also one of the rea­sons why we’ve in­vested in R&D for projects like Lav­ina that will con­tinue to de­velop real-time ray trac­ing, which can solve ad­di­tional prob­lems like scene com­plex­ity and the need to cre­ate UV maps.

IN WHAT WAYS DO YOU THINK THAT THE ARCH-VIZ IN­DUS­TRY WILL BEN­E­FIT FROM FU­TURE TECH­NO­LOG­I­CAL AD­VANCE­MENTS?

As tech ad­vances and you make the cre­ative or vi­su­al­i­sa­tion process eas­ier, the ben­e­fits will be more avail­able and ap­proach­able to ev­ery­one. It’ll also be a more in­tu­itive cre­ative ex­pres­sion for the artist.

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