Sound judge­ment

THE LAT­EST AL­BUM RE­LEASES RATED AND RE­VIEWED

Bangor Mail - - The Music Interview -

LEWIS CA­PALDI DIVINELY UNIN­SPIRED TO A HELLISH EX­TENT ★★★★★

IG­NORE the some­what mo­rose ti­tle, this record is an ab­so­lute de­light.

From start to fin­ish, Scot­tish singer-song­writer Lewis Ca­paldi croons through the 12 tracks, raw emo­tions spilling over via his heav­enly, charis­matic voice.

From epic opener Grace to the pared-back and ef­fort­lessly emo­tive Headspace – via the melodic For­ever, pi­ano bal­lad Bruises and Don’t Get Me Wrong, a bro­ken-down track with a slow, blusey beat and a choir – it’s ob­vi­ous not one track is filler.

Ca­paldi oozes tal­ent and he is de­pend­able. His lyrics are rich and clever, and his voice is soul­ful far be­yond his 22 years.

SLOWTHAI

NOTH­ING GREAT ABOUT BRI­TAIN ★★★★★

TY­RON

FRAMP­TON’S nim­ble, vit­ri­olic and darkly comic mu­sic has had a re­mark­able im­pact on the Bri­tish scene since his de­but two years ago.

The Northamp­ton-raised rap­per, who per­forms as Slowthai, pil­fers from post-punk and dub as much as from hip-hop and grime on his de­but al­bum.

Where most UK rap­pers look to the glam­our of Amer­ica’s trap scene and Drake for in­spi­ra­tion, tat­toocov­ered Slowthai looks to the punk aes­thetic. This gives Noth­ing Great About Bri­tain an anti-es­tab­lish­ment bite.

On tracks like Gor­geous and Peace Of Mind, he takes aim at May, Boris, Brexit, the royal fam­ily, in­equal­ity – any­thing that touches the pub­lic con­scious­ness.

Slowthai’s mu­sic is riotous and au­then­tic and pro­vides a wel­come change.

CARLY RAE JEPSEN

DED­I­CATED ★★★★★

WHERE Jepsen pre­vi­ously had you singing into your hair­brush, open­ing track Julien has a disco groove run­ning un­der the ode to in­fat­u­ated love.

Al­though the track is not worlds away from for­mer re­leases, her sound and sub­ject mat­ter have ma­tured.

Feels Right does, in­deed, feel right.

For Sure and Au­to­mat­i­cally In Love are the per­fect dance-pop songs for the sum­mer, al­though to­wards the end of the al­bum the con­stant croon­ing of love does be­come a tad te­dious.

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