LOST FROM BRITAIN

Four birds that once thrived in the Bri­tish Isles.

BBC Wildlife Magazine - - Talking Point -

WRYNECK

Wry­necks were a bird of trees and anthills in bare soil: a mo­saic habi­tat cre­ated by ex­ten­sively graz­ing an­i­mals. With the loss of Britain’s wooded pas­tures, as agri­cul­ture in­ten­si­fied, wry­necks van­ished too.

DALMATIAN PELICAN

Pre­his­toric ‘fish hoovers’ with 3m wing­spans, Dalmatian pel­i­cans had van­ished from Som­er­set and Cam­bridgeshire by Ro­man times. Fos­silised bones show the birds were eaten by yp peo­ple p who colonised the marshes.

HAZEL GROUSE

Fos­sils found in the Mendips re­veal that hazel grouse once haunted Britain’s wood­lands. At the time its land­scape was closer to the taiga of Fin­land today. A chang­ing cli­mate and shift­ing tree cover may have driven them o out.

EA­GLE OWL

Ea­gle owls are an adapt­able species that breed on wooded cliffs across Europe. They are also ag­gres­sive near the nest, so did they dis­ap­pear due to early con­flict with hu­mans?

EX­TINCT 10,000 BCE

EX­TINCT 10,000 BCE

EX­TINCT 1985

EX­TINCT 43 CE

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