Carol McGif­fin

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‘Last week I slipped on a rug in my own house af­ter the anti-slip rub­ber bit un­der­neath had folded un­der. I bruised my back and nar­rowly missed cut­ting my head open.

So, I’m won­der­ing who I can sue? The Moroc­can Ber­ber who sold me the rug back in 1994? Maybe I should sue Ikea for not mak­ing its non-slip rug un­der­lay non­slip enough? Or per­haps I should just sue my­self for stupidly putting the rug there in the first place?

I got the idea from two sto­ries that caught my eye last week. One was about a woman who was paid £485,000 af­ter she sus­tained brain in­juries due to, wait for it, tram surf­ing. Age 13, she was hang­ing on to the out­side of a tram when she fell on the track and hit her head. The woman ad­mit­ted it was her fault, but sued the tram com­pany any­way.

Then there’s the woman who broke her back fall­ing off a bed while hav­ing sex. Now paral­ysed, she’s su­ing the bed com­pany. I wouldn’t wish such in­juries on any­one, but I can’t quite see how it could be the bed’s fault.

This is where we are now. There is no such thing as an ac­ci­dent or per­sonal re­spon­si­bil­ity any more.

I blame which­ever gov­ern­ment al­lowed the “no win, no fee” cul­ture to flour­ish, but I also blame the US – where peo­ple sue sand­wich com­pa­nies be­cause their butties aren’t big enough – for start­ing it in the first place.’

N O T S N H O J Y K C I N , Y T E G

THIN IS IN DO YOU RE­ALLY HAVE A CASE? BUT IS IT ART? ER, NO!

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