DROP THE WAGE

WE’RE EARN­ING £39 A WEEK LESS IN REAL TERMS THAN WE WERE IN 2010

Bristol Post - - DATA BRIEFING - By AN­NIE GOUK OUK

AVER­AGE wages have fallen in real terms since 2010 - and men in their 30s have taken the big­gest cut. Lat­est fig­ures from the Of­fice for Na­tional Statis­tics have re­vealed that the aver­age full time em­ployee was earn­ing £569 a week in 2018.

While that’s up from £499 a week in 2010, it’s ac­tu­ally a drop once in­fla­tion is taken into ac­count.

In to­day’s money, £499 in 2010 would ac­tu­ally be worth around £608 -

mean­ing that aver­age earn­ings have fallen in real terms by 6% in the last eight years.

That’s a drop of £39 a week - or more than £2,000 a year.

And while most peo­ple across the coun­try will have felt the squeeze, some groups have been hit harder than oth­ers.

Men aged 30 to 39 have seen the most sig­nif­i­cant cut in aver­age earn­ings, with the typ­i­cal wage fall­ing from £698 a week in 2010 (af­ter in­fla­tion) to £630 this year.

The 10% real-terms pay cut sees men in this age group los­ing out on £68 a week, or more than £3,500 a year.

In com­par­i­son, women in the same age group have seen aver­age wages drop by around £45 a week, or closer to £2,300 an­nu­ally.

The aver­age weekly wage for women aged 30-39 was the equiv­a­lent of £620 a week in 2010, and this has fallen by 7% to £575 a week this year.

Mean­while, women aged 40-49 have seen the small­est cut in aver­age earn­ings over the last eight years.

Aver­age weekly wages for women in this age group have dropped by less than 1%, from £575 in 2010 to £571 in 2018.

In gen­eral, women have seen aver­age wages fall less steeply than men, al­though this is largely be­cause women were earn­ing less in the first place.

And even though the gen­der wage gap is grad­u­ally shrink­ing, women across all age groups con­tinue to earn less than their male coun­ter­parts.

Across all full time em­ploy­ees, men earn 20% more than women, with the aver­age man’s weekly wage com­ing in at £609 in 2018 com­pared to £509 for the aver­age woman’s.

The gap is most pro­nounced for those aged 50-59 - women in this age group earn £515 a week on aver­age, while men earn 30% more at £667.

This is more com­plex than men and women not be­ing paid the same in like­for-like jobs, al­though this does some­times hap­pen.

Men are more likely to be em­ployed in oc­cu­pa­tions that pay bet­ter, and to be in bet­ter-paid po­si­tions within the same in­dus­try.

All fig­ures have been ad­justed for in­fla­tion

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